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Major Autumn Auction

Saturday 29. November 2014 at 3 p.m.

263 Lots

Our 2014 autumn auction

The generational change has set in motion a restructuring phase in the art market. Many collections compiled over the course of decades are now being dissolved, none more so than carpet collections. Heirs often feel no affinity with oriental carpets collected by their parents or grandparents and decide to sell them. Experienced older collectors frequently put up their treasures for auction during their lifetimes so as to have a hand in the proceedings themselves. This means that very good objects are returning to the market. Our autumn auction offers numerous examples of this trend.

Most of the fifteen Suzanis included in our A 85 sale have been consigned from the UK. The collector purchased them from leading rug dealers and is now selling them for reasons of age. – An elderly lady from northern Italy with many years of collecting experience has consigned forty-five carpets and textiles, instructing us to apply very moderate guide prices to ensure that preferably all her pieces will find new owners. We have indicated the provenance of this particular collection (Signora Gallo Collection). – Most of the Anatolian kilims are from two private collections. A Palatinate manufacturer was deeply involved in kilims for thirty years, but his children pursue other interests. A Swiss architect discovered his love of Anatolian kilims during many years of living in oriental countries. One of the greatest experts on Islamic architecture, he restored Islamic old towns on behalf of the Aga Khan Foundation and came into close contact with oriental textiles during his work. – Since the re-establishment of our company in 1987, Rippon Boswell has been able to successfully auction many rare and valuable Turkmen rugs. A particular highlight of this sale is the Eagle Group I carpet showing a stripe design which has been consigned from the USA.

The items offered at this sale also include several European pieces. The five cushion covers dating from the late Renaissance period were woven in northern German workshops run by Dutch emigrants and are truly lucky finds. The UK consignor purchased them from the famous C. John company in London a long time ago. Moreover, we are pleased to offer two modern French pictorial weavings. Woven ca. 1950 in the tapestry technique, the “Le Tarasque” Aubusson tapestry is based on a design by Jean Lurçat. The Picasso pile rug “Le Vase” was woven at Marie Cutolli’s Paris studio to an original design by Pablo Picasso in 1960.

 
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  • Konya Kilim

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    • Lot51
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Konya region
    • Dimensions355 x 76 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR3,400
    A very old Konya kilim in wonderful colours. The spaciously conceived design of the field consists of hexagons with lateral double hooks arranged into wide horizontal bands and interspersed with dividing borders. Two white-ground box shapes containing six “X”-shapes are seen at each end of the field. The surviving section constitutes one half of the two-panel field. The halved hexagons aligned along the inner side are proof that it was originally divided in two. Together with the borders, which were woven separately, the kilim thus consisted of four panels. – Obvious signs of age and wear, tears and holes, damaged sides. Neither restored nor mounted.
  • Two Konya Fragments

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    • Lot52
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Konya region
    • Dimensionsa = 148 x 55 cm, b = 116 x 50 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR2,800
    Two fragments of an early Konya rug showing a floral design and wavy lines on a red ground. Squares decorated with eight triangles each are aligned in a row in the white border. Fragment A is part of the upper left-hand side, fragment B constitutes part of the lower right-hand side. Fragment no. 154 of the Orient Stars Collection, sold by us in October 1999, is the upper right-hand corner of the same carpet. If all three fragments were united they would produce a fairly complete picture of the original appearance. – Obvious signs of age and wear, unmounted.

    Literature:
    KIRCHHEIM, E. HEINRICH, Orient Stars – A Carpet Collection. Katalog der Ausstellungen in Hamburg und Stuttgart. Stuttgart - London 1993, no. 154 = RIPPON BOSWELL A 52, 2nd October 1999, # 65

  • Bird Ushak

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    • Lot52A
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Selendi
    • Dimensionsca. 196 x 133 cm
    • AgeMid 17th century
    • Estimate EUR19,500
    White-ground carpets displaying this type of field design – geometric stylised bird motifs and a wide cloudband border – were included in European collections at an early stage. A large number of small-format Bird Ushaks has survived in Transylvanian churches. The example offered here, with the characteristic "lazy lines" in the ground weave, once belonged to the famous Wher Collection and later to a northern German private collection. In palette and ornamentation it is equivalent to inventory number 146 in the Black Church of Brasov. – Major sections of the field and large parts of the border have been repiled; replaced finishes all around.

    Literature:
    Literature: IONESCU, STEFANO (ed.), Die Osmanischen Teppiche in Siebenbürgen. Rome 2006. Cat. 59, p. 108

  • Kermina Suzani

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    • Lot53
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions248 x 170 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800
    • Estimate EUR14,500
    A large Suzani from the town of Kermina in the Emirate of Bokhara with a brownish cotton ground. The diamond lattice of green leaves is not drawn in the same mechanical style as seen in later examples, but retains an appearance of movement due to slight irregularities, imbuing the composition with a lively expression. The design is directional as each of the flowers is attached to a stem. Large circular and fan-shaped blossoms surrounded by elongated leaves make up the border design. Kermina Suzanis are characterised by an elegant style and an attractive palette. – Minor repairs; several missing sections have been backed with fabric, otherwise well preserved. Backed with canvas.

    Literature:
    YIGAL, YANAI, Suzani. Central Asian Embroideries. Ausstellungskatalog Haaretz Museum. Tel Aviv 1986, fig. 8

  • Tekke Main Carpet

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    • Lot54
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions274 x 191 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR17,500
    This classic Tekke main carpet from an old Swiss private collection was on display at the Basel Gewerbemuseum as early as 1980, and published in the catalogue of that exhibition. In addition to the primary and secondary güls, small eight-pointed güls decorated with arrows form a third design layer. – Very good condition, including the wide kilim ends.

    Published:
    GEWERBEMUSEUM BASEL (publ.), Alte Teppiche aus dem Orient. (exhibition catalogue) Basel 1980, pl. p. 119

  • Tekke Main Carpet

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    • Lot55
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions272 x 216 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,500
    A large main carpet by the Tekke tribe with 5 x 10 primary güls, chemche secondary motifs, a densely patterned border and pile-woven elems of tree forms aligned in a row. The fairly coarse weave, heavy and flexible handle, velvety pile wool and rich luminous colours indicate that this main carpet was probably woven in the first half of the 19th century. – The cords at both sides were attached at a later date, several old repiled sections, signs of age and wear.

    Literature:
    SCHÜRMANN, ULRICH, Zentral-Asiatische Teppiche. Frankfurt a.M. 1969, no. 1 *** HAMBURGISCHES MUSEUM FÜR VÖLKERKUNDE (publ.), Wie Blumen in der Wüste. Die Kultur der turkmenischen Nomadenstämme Zentralasiens. Hamburg 1993, no. 20

  • Chodor Prayer Rug

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    • Lot56
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions175 x 113 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,400
    A rare Chodor prayer rug woven on a goat hair warp. The upper end of the field is not rectangular, but has been adapted to fit the stepped shape of the arch. A wide kilim edge surrounds the rug on all sides. The design of the field – a repeat of large erre güls enclosed within a hexagonal lattice of serrated bands – is based on the tribe’s door rugs. Gable shapes decorated with hooks adorn the elem. – Good condition.
  • Pao Tao Sitting Mat

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    • Lot57
    • OriginNorth East China
    • Dimensions70 x 71 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR600
    This small square Pao Tao sitting mat shows a meander border, coloured to create sense of perspective, and a lattice design of small octagons enclosing flowers and swastika symbols on a blue field. In the red-ground disc medallion placed at the centre of the field, peonies and leaves are arranged around a circular flower. – Published by Engelhardt in 1978 and purchased by the consignor in the same year, the excellent condition of this carpet remains unchanged.

    Published:
    ENGELHARDT, EVA, Teppiche. Die Bilder des Orients. Carpets. The pictures of the Orient. Vol. II. Heidelberg 1978, no. 359

  • Ningxia Bench Runner Fragment

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    • Lot58
    • OriginWest China
    • Dimensions221 x 59 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR850
    A fragment of a blue-ground bench runner produced in the weaving centre of Ningxia, West China, as a commission for a Tibetan monastery. The surviving four rectangular panels are still joined; originally the rug would have been much longer. The four compartments of identical design each have at their centres the most important Tibetan Buddhist symbol of authority – a powerful double dorje symbol outlined in yellow lines and enclosing a light blue central box shape. It is framed by diagonal vines in the corners. The division into sections of bench runners results from their purpose: each compartment constituted the seat of a monk. – Both end finishes repiled, otherwise well preserved.
    • Lot59
    • OriginSouth West Anatolia
    • Dimensions183 x 137 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,600
    The golden yellow field of this classic Megri is divided into two sections by one blue-ground and one green-ground vertical design bar containing tree forms. The lower end of the field presents a horizontal row of geometric figures in an in-and-out rhythm. The wide border section consists of four panels. The light and warm palette is a typical feature of rugs from Megri (also known as Makri, now renamed Fethiye), a city on the Aegean that used to be largely populated by Greeks. – Original finishes all around, red kilim ends, some repairs to the sides, low spots in the pile.

    Literature:
    OSTLER, HERBERT & GEISSELMANN, ÄGIDIUS, Die Teppichkunst des Orients und die Kunst der Moderne. Munich 1980, p. 47