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VOK COLLECTION, Selection II

Saturday 12. March 2016 at 3 p.m.

88 Lots
  • Suzani Dress

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    • Lot99
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • DimensionsLänge 148 cm
    • Age19th and 20th centuries
    • Estimate EUR2,800 - 3,300
    VOK Collection, Suzani 2, 53

    The top and wide hem are made up from sections of an antique Bokhara suzani with a vine and flower design which were joined to an undecorated, plain white hand-woven cotton fabric. A new item outside the local tradition was thus created. Taube surmises that this dress was “sewn by a self-confident European woman (Russian?) or was commissioned". The question remains unanswered, but it is certain that women in Uzbekistan did not wear such dresses. – Small stains, good overall condition.

    Published:
    GONZALES, A., Paradiese der Geduld. In: Architectural Digest, March 2003, pp. 70-72 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 2006, no. 53

  • Samarkand Suzani

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    • Lot100
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions252 x 177 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR24,000 - 28,000
    VOK Collection, Suzani 2, 56

    Nine large circular blossoms arranged in three parallel rows constitute the primary design of this Samarkand suzani, elaborately embroidered in the yurma chain stitch technique on a foundation of eight panels of varying widths (the two outer panels are very narrow). A closer look reveals that the panels were not individually embroidered and later joined, as was usual, but that three and two panels respectively had been joined before the embroidery work began. In the outer sections, the design seamlessly runs across three panels; at the centre, it runs across two. – All the large blossoms are surrounded by boldly drawn, petrol green leaf vines which open to one side, ending in two calyx forms. The interior drawing of the primary motifs consists of pink, purple and dark red colour segments surrounding a central circular blossom embroidered in light and contrasting colours. The direction of the stitches has been cleverly adapted to follow the curvilinear shapes of the designs, further enlivening the design. Four of the blossoms contain an eight-pointed star, its arms resembling the spokes of a wheel. The blossom placed at the centre of the field is accentuated by six water jugs arranged radially. The spaces not covered by the main design contain smaller blossoms drawn in top view and side view, embedded into a network of petrol green leaf vines. In the border, an elongated wavy leaf vine connects palmette-like flowers seen in side view, alternately embroidered in reds and blues. The drawing of the border is a characteristic feature of Samarkand embroideries. – The embroidered seams used for outlining the centres of the large blossoms and the presence of many small botehs are stylistic features of Lakai work, indicating an influence of this nature. Little is known about the Lakai and the other Uzbek nomad tribes. Russian literature does not provide information on them. Fitz Gibbon and Hale do not believe that those wild tribes ever gave up their nomadic life, while Fling assumes that parts of those tribes became settled and then began to create large-format suzanis. It must be obvious that certain suzanis made in south western Uzbekistan deviate from the established provenances in composition, ornamentation, style and palette to such an extent that they should be considered a group in their own right. – Good condition, mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    TSCHEPELEWEZKAJA, G.L. & SUCHAREWA, O.A., Susani Usbekistans. Hamburg 1991, ill. 23, p. 113

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 2006, no. 56

  • Ura Tube Suzani

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    • Lot101
    • OriginCentral Asia, North East Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions253 x 240 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR25,000 - 30,000
    VOK Collection, Suzani 2, 65

    Almost square in format, this suzani was made in Ura Tube, a town in the old Emirate of Kokand situated in an important strategic position at the entrance to the fertile Ferghana Valley. It was a place where trade routes intersected, hence it is not surprising that the designs of Ura Tube embroideries show influences from North East and South West Uzbekistan. The field and the very wide main border are decorated with idential designs. Large shrubs bearing red fan-shaped blossoms and green leaves form an ascending design in the field; they are aligned in different directions in the border. An eight-pointed star placed at the centre of the field, its central blossom radially surrounded by flowers and serrated lancet leaves, almost disappears into the abundant growth of the sprawling plants. Smaller motifs, most of them in brilliant and diverse colours, have been incorporated into the main design everywhere. The green wisteria sinensis blossoms studded with small red dots and aligned like chains are a reliable indication of the provenance because they only occur in Ura Tube embroideries. The light greens are a typical feature as well. This embroidery appears particularly imposing on account of the large scale of its designs and its spacious composition. – Signs of age and wear, several tears in the foundation.

    Literature:
    LINDAHL, DAVID & KNORR, THOMAS, Uzbek. The textiles and life of the nomadic and sedentary Uzbek tribes of Central-Asia. Lörrach-Tüllingen 1975, pl. 22

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 2006, no. 65

  • Large Medallion Suzani

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    • Lot102
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions178 x 122 cm
    • Ageca. 1800 or earlier
    • Estimate EUR38,000 - 42,000
    VOK Collection, Suzani 1, 45

    Most of the over fifty so-called large medallion suzanis known to date are large in size, with lengths ranging from 2.5 to 3 metres and huge central medallions to suit the format. However, smaller examples were made in the "nim" format only half this size. They are far more rare. The monograph published by Michael Franses in 2000 lists just eight suzanis measuring less than two metres in length. – This gorgeous nim suzani, catalogued as "G2" by Franses, was first published in HALI magazine in 1978. At the time it was still owned by a Johannesburg collector. It significantly differs from other large medallion suzanis in its extremely fine embroidery, in this case a yurma chain stitch throughout. It allowed even the smallest details to be precisely rendered and to create wonderful effects in the unusually rich colours. It is a highly elegant and delicate example that creates a very different impression from the large-format suzanis with their huge medallions and explosive designs in blazing colours. – The elongated central motif with rounded corners contains a wide cross which is associated with a multitude of small, mosaic-style designs. Small water jugs (ibrik) and tiny birds have been incorporated everywhere. The golden spiral surrounding the design is a stylistic feature of the group. Four diagonal bars which disappear under the border at the sides, but converge at the top and bottom centres, combine into two gables at the ends of the field or, when viewed as a whole, into an elongated hexagon with the medallion at its centre. The wide main border displays large blossoms, alternately in top view and side view, linked by a green vine. These motifs contain further birds and water jugs. The outer guard stripe is fully embroidered in a design of small diamonds. – In the light of the deviations described above, it is unlikely that this suzani is from the city of Bokhara or its vicinity, but may have been made in the embroidery centre of Kermina further to the north east. We propose a conservative date around 1800, but feel that an even earlier date is conceivable. A comparative piece was published by Herrmann. – Slight signs of age and wear, good overall condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche VIII. Munich 1986, no. 109

    Published:
    FRANSES, MICHAEL & PINNER, ROBERT, Large Medallion Suzani. In: HALI Vol. I, no. 2. London 1978, p. 133, no. 6 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 45 *** FRANSES, MICHAEL, The Great Embroideries of Bukhara. London 2000, G2, ill. p. 80

  • Qashqa’i Kilim

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    • Lot103
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions247 x 163 cm
    • Agelate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 6,000
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 89

    Five rectangles decorated with a green-and-red chequerboard design stand alone in the white field. The central rectangle is accentuated by its size and a cruciform device placed at its centre. Large sections of the field ground have been rewoven. The restoration report published in the Vok book states that the kilim probably had a greater number of chequerboard compartments in its original condition. The rare border design – chains of blue and white stepped polygons in the main border, which is flanked by wavy lines, and bands of blue and yellow squares providing an inner and outer surround – is a particularly striking feature. – Extensively restored.

    Literature:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. Munich 1980, no. 407

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 89

  • Qashqa’i Kilim

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    • Lot104
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions244 x 153 cm
    • Age2nd half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 84

    This Qashqa’i kilim, probably a weaving by the Kashkuli tribe, stands out on account of its exceptionally fine weave. Patinated with age, the plain white field has taken on a nuanced ivory hue. The inner sides of the field are decorated with halved diamonds in diverse colours; the corners are strikingly accentuated by large triangles of polychrome, stepped diagonal bands. The wavy line design of the spandrels is probably of symbolic importance and does not occur in other white-ground examples. In the border, the reciprocal trefoils that are characteristic of Qashqa’i kilims are placed on a white cotton ground which sets off the designs to particularly bold effect. Further sections of the design are also woven in white cotton. Kilims of this outstanding quality were not destined for everyday use, but were woven for a special occasion, possibly a wedding, and later stored. – In 1996 Sadighi was aware of just seven white-ground examples. The Vok kilim was first published by Petsopoulos in 1979 (at the time still owned by the Textile Gallery, London), then belonged to the collection of the British architect, Georgie Wolton (see contribution in HALI) and was later acquired by Vok. – Completely preserved, including the braided warps at both ends and the original side finishes. Various minor stains, several rewoven sections. Good overall condition.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche VI. Munich 1984, no. 69 *** GALERIE NEIRIZ (publ.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990, ill. 70 *** SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe, undated (2014), no. 151 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, auction of the Kossow Collection. 26th March 2011, # 108

    Published:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. Munich 1980, no. 382 *** HALI vol. 4, no. 1, Kilims in the Home, p. 4, ill. 7 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 84 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 153

  • Konya Kilim

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    • Lot105
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions445 x 166 cm
    • Age2nd half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 6,000
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 44

    Kilims presenting this impressive composition of offset concentric diamonds were woven in various Anatolian regions. According to Hirsch, the Vok kilim – exhibited in Dublin as early as 1979 – was made in the Yerli village of Dere in the Konya region. Several comparative pieces published in literature are attributed to the area between Afyon and Kütahya in western Central Anatolia. – The diamonds are composed of concentric serrated bands in diverse colours that increase in size in an almost inexorable, undulating outward movement, imbuing the design with a dynamic expression. It is conceived as an endless repeat that continues beyond the lateral sides, and consequently this kilim type lacks the lateral borders. The white design sections create order in the composition, combining into two powerful large devices aligned on the central axis. Small brocaded decorative motifs are informally scattered across the entire surface. – Good condition.

    Literature:
    BALPINAR, BELKIS & HIRSCH, UDO, Flachgewebe des Vakiflar-Museums Istanbul. Wesel 1982, no. 6 *** PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, 100 Kelims. Meisterwerke aus Anatolien. Munich 1991, 51 *** KELIM-CONNECTION AACHEN (publ.), Kultkelim. Ausgewählte anatolische Flachgewebe. Aachen 1999, pl. 12 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 60, 17th May 2003, # 17

    Published:
    MARCUSON, ALAN & FRANSES, MICHAEL, Kilims. The Traditional Tapestries Of Turkey. (Exhibition catalogue of the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin). London 1979, no. 2 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 44

  • Aksaray Kilim

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    • Lot106
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Konya region
    • Dimensions391 x 142 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 67

    In this two-panel Aksaray kilim, the extremely fine weave has resulted in a precise drawing. Any connoisseur of Anatolian weavings will be enchanted by its magnificent colours; it is considered the most beautiful surviving example. Four large hexagons oppose each other in the white field, their sides decorated with horizontal arms and small stepped diamonds. Four rows of smaller octagons are interspersed between them. A horizontal row of six amulets placed at the exact centre of the field constitutes the pivotal point of the precisely drawn, mirror-image composition. A red-ground border of double serrated diamonds surrounds the entire field, clearly separating this section from the two unusually long elems whose motifs relate to the field and border designs. – The kilim was probably made by a group of settled Hotamis Turkmen in the Aksaray region. Hirsch writes that it was used for a funeral and later donated to the local mosque. – Signs of age and wear, small holes, slightly reduced ends. Backed with canvas.

    Literature:
    ESKENAZI, JOHNNY (publ.), Kilim anatolici. Milan 1984, pl. 11

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 67

  • Karaman Prayer Kilim,

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    • Lot107
    • Originsouthern Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions185 x 100 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR2,500 - 3,300
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 12

    This early prayer kilim presents a plain red mihrab which is slim as a tower and topped by a slender pointed arch. The two triangular compartments flanking the arch are woven in changing shades of blue and green. Two wide borders with interlocked outlines are decorated with double arrow motifs in diverse colours. The ground glimpsed beneath the double arrow devices adds a slight vibrancy to the solemn appearance of the field. The composition of a very few designs positioned with assurance is highly balanced, creating a vigorous and confident appearance. Herrmann who first published the kilim in 1986 assumes a date in the 18th century, pointing not only to the style but also to the quality of the colours and the presence of lazy lines. We feel that the date proposed by Hirsch (2nd half 19th century) is too conservative. A further example from the same group was exhibited in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1986. – Good condition, backed with canvas.

    Literature:
    HALI 32, London 1886, p. 99

    Published:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche VIII. Munich 1986, no. 13 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 12

  • Sivrihisar Niche Kilim

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    • Lot108
    • Originwestern Central Anatolia, Eskisehir province
    • Dimensions120 x 90 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 11

    This delightful small kilim is impressive on account of its powerful design vocabulary and beautiful colours. The aubergine mihrab is topped by a small, roof-like arch with an attached diamond-shaped point in the same aubergine colour. The mihrab contains two hexagons divided into triangular colour sections and, above these, two red devices attached at the sides and outlined in white cross shapes. Four of the same devices outlined in crosses are aligned horizontally in the inner elem stripe, where they appear in different colours (aubergine, blue, yellow and red). Four red shapes protrude laterally into the blue-green section above the arch. The bold house-like designs seen in the wide white-ground border are known as "kümbet" in Anatolia. Reminiscent of a yurt, their shape may be a distant memory of the nomadic origins of a tribe that became settled a long time ago. Hirsch writes that the kilim was made in a Yerli village located between Kütahya and Sivrihisar, stating that it was used as a wall niche curtain. In our opinion, the small format may indicate that the kilim was intended as a prayer rug. However, the absence of the typical signs of wear would contradict this idea. A further example of this extremely rare group is kept in the Vakiflar Museum, Istanbul (inv. no. 61). – Good condition.

    Literature:
    BALPINAR, BELKIS & HIRSCH, UDO, Flachgewebe des Vakiflar-Museums Istanbul. Wesel 1982, pl. 63 *** RAGETH, JÜRG, Kilim. Rome 1986, no. 13

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 11