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VOK COLLECTION, Selection III

Saturday 25. March 2017 at 3 p.m.

94 Lots
  • Shahsavan Kilim

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    • Lot187
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Azerbaijan, Karadagh region
    • Dimensions360 x 95 cm jede Bahn
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 3,600
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 36

    Two long kilim panels densely woven in a design of wide aubergine, white and red horizontal stripes on a mottled brown-and-white wool warp. Clusters of either four or five thin dividing stripes are interspersed between them. Small apotropaic symbols have been randomly brocaded into the wide panels. It is uncertain whether these two kilims, almost identical but discovered in different places and at different times, ever formed a whole and were joined at the centre. However, the fact that the horizontal stripe design does not quite fit horizontally and increasingly diverges along the length of the rug is not proof to the contrary. This kind of misalignment is nothing unusual in two-panel kilims, for instance those from Anatolia. – A closely related kilim with white stripes woven in cotton was published by Tanavoli and attributed to the Hamamlu, who probably belong to the Shahsavan tribal confederation. They live in an eponymous village located some 100 kilometres north east of Tabriz in the foothills of the Karadagh mountains and originally belonged to the Moghan Shahsavan. - Slight signs of age and wear, several small stains, original finishes all around.

    Literature:
    TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, Tf. 8

    Published:
    GALERIE NEIRIZ (Hrsg.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990, Abb. 8 (eine Hälfte) *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 36

  • Afyon Kilim

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    • Lot188
    • OriginWestern Central Anatolia, Phrygia
    • Dimensions338 x 167 cm
    • AgeCa. 1880
    • Estimate EUR3,800 - 4,500
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 46

    Three large, nested dark brown diamonds joined at their tips and enclosing analogous designs are aligned on the central axis of the white field. The inner motifs are surrounded by brocaded white X-forms and diamonds. The sides of the field are decorated with a double structure of blue and red bands, regularly protruding in box shapes towards the centre of the field. It is no coincidence that the strictly geometric style of straight lines and right angles has an architectural appearance. According to Ulrich Türck, it constitutes the ancient mural crown design of towers and gates. Aside from their specific palette of mellow, rather pale shades and a particular weaving technique, with some use of eccentric wefts and outlines accentuated by colour, the distinguishing feature of the unmistakeable Afyon kilims is their deeply incised outlines resembling fingers around all the motifs. This has resulted in the group being named "parmakli" kilims. Made in the highlands between Afyon, Kütahya and Eskişehir – i.e. ancient Phrygia – they have been woven by the indigenous population for a very long time. A parmakli kilim published by Petsopoulos in "Der Kelim" in 1980 drew attention the group, which had been little known beforehand. In their article published in HALI in 1985, Balpinar and Hirsch provided a summary of the knowledge then available and undertook a classification of the various design types of parmakli kilims. The Vok kilim, previously published by Eskenazi, belongs to group seven (medallions). Hirsch reports that A 46 was discovered in the village of Egret situated along the road from Afyon to Kütahya. – Good condition.

    Literature:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. München 1980, Nr. 1 *** BALPINAR ACAR, BELKIS, Kilim-Cicim-Zili-Sumak. Türkische Flachgewebe. Istanbul 1983, Tf. 10 *** BALPINAR, BELKIS & HIRSCH, UDO, Flachgewebe des Vakiflar-Museums Istanbul. Wesel 1982, Tf. 76 *** BALPINAR, BELKIS & HIRSCH, UDO, Parmakli Kilims. In: HALI 26, 1985, S. 12 - 17 *** HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche V. München 1983, Nr. 19 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Kelim. Antike orientalische Flachgewebe. Mannheim & München 1983, Tf. 31

    Published:
    ESKENAZI, JOHN J.(Hrsg.), Kilim. Mailand 1980, Nr. 5 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 46

  • Cappadocian Kilim

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    • Lot189
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions280 x 140 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 59

    In this unusual two-panel kilim, only the wide light-red main border and the white-ground elems are decorated in various designs, while the sea-green field is a wide open space enlivened by changing shades of the ground colour. The two sections are interlocked by ornate reciprocal double hooks running along the sides and reciprocal wavy lines placed at both ends of the field. Hirsch writes that the kilim was used at a funeral and then donated to the local mosque, as was the custom. An almost identical example of this rare group was published in HALI and described as a Karapinar. – Slight signs of age and wear, good overall condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    HALI 32, 1986, Abb. S. 98

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 59

  • Korkuteli Kilim

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    • Lot190
    • OriginSouth Anatolia
    • Dimensions390 x 140 cm
    • AgeCa. 1880
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,200
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 43

    This rare kilim woven in a single panel is from Korkuteli, a small town some 60 kilometres north west of Antalya in southern Anatolia. Its field design consists of small cross devices in blue, olive green and white. The motifs form a decidedly minimalist design on the red ground of the field, combining into concentric diamonds composed of colour diagonals, with a large device at the centre and two halved diamonds cut by the yellow outer stripes at the two ends of the field. Delicate, white stepped zigzag bands constitute the lateral outer finishes – mere suggestions of a border but enough to check the outward movement of the field design. Hirsch reports that these kilims were only made in Korkuteli and served as divan covers. Three examples of a second design group from Korkuteli were published by Petsopoulos. – Slight signs of age and wear, mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, 100 Kelims. Meisterwerke aus Anatolien. München 1991, Nr. 27 - 29

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 43

  • Tashkent Suzani Saf

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    • Lot191
    • OriginCentral Asia, North East Uzbekistan, Khanate of Ko
    • Dimensions355 x 90 cm
    • AgeCa. 1850 – 1875
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 2, 54

    Judging by its design, style and palette, this suzani in a long horizontal format is a typical piece from the city of Tashkent in the old Khanate of Kokand. It was made by Uzbeks, unlike the vast majority of suzanis which are Tajik pieces. This type of suzani is a saf, meaning a multiple prayer rug; however, it was not used for this purpose, serving instead as a decorative wall hanging with an iconography inspired by religion. Separated by vertical borders, the eight rectangular portrait format fields contain a somewhat inconspicuous, pointed central arch which almost disappears among the wealth of brilliant red circular blossoms and green vines. Rugs showing mihrab fields set side by side are a familiar design frequently encountered in Anatolia as well as India and East Turkestan. It is conceivable that the saf type found its way to Central Asia from there. – Good condition.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jacob Taube). München 2006, Nr. 54

  • Ura Tube Suzani

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    • Lot192
    • OriginCentral Asia, North East Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions253 x 240 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR14,000 - 17,000
    VOK Collection, Suzani 2, 65

    Almost square in format, this suzani was made in Ura Tube, a town in the former Khanate of Kokand situated in an important strategic position at the entrance to the fertile Ferghana Valley. It was a place where trade routes intersected, hence it is not surprising that the designs of Ura Tube embroideries show influences from North East as well as South West Uzbekistan. The field and the very wide main border are decorated with identical designs. Large shrubs bearing red fan-shaped blossoms framed by green leaves form a directional design in the field; in the border, they point in the opposite direction in almost every instance. An eight-pointed star placed at the centre of the field, its central blossom radially surrounded by flowers and serrated lancet leaves, recedes into the abundant growth of the sprawling plants and is only discerned upon closer inspection. Smaller motifs, most of them in brilliant and diverse colours, have been incorporated into the main design everywhere. The green wisteria blossoms studded with small red dots and aligned like chains are a reliable indication of the provenance since they only occur in Ura Tube embroideries. The light greens are another characteristic feature. The embroidery appears particularly imposing on account of the large scale of its designs and its spacious composition. – Signs of age and wear, several tears in the foundation.

    Literature:
    LINDAHL, DAVID & KNORR, THOMAS, Uzbek. The textiles and life of the nomadic and sedentary Uzbek tribes of Central-Asia. Lörrach-Tüllingen 1975, Tf. 22

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jacob Taube). München 2006, Nr. 65

  • Qashqa’i Kilim

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    • Lot193
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions277 x 144 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,500
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 98

    This Qashqa’i kilim presenting a chequerboard design belongs to the same group as the kilim CP 97 (RB catalogue Vok I, lot 35) preceding it in the Vok publication. According to Sadighi, both kilims are Kashkuli weavings made in the Kohgiluyeh region south of Semiron. The outlines of their designs are woven in the weft interlocking technique, increasing the stability of the textile as slits in the weave are avoided. Very similar in concept, the two kilims nevertheless appear very different due to deviations in colour and detail. With its bright palette and a design reduced to essentials, CP 97 has a minimalist, poster-like and "modern" appearance, like a work of western Op Art. The darker kilim CP 98 has a field design composed of 66 rectangular compartments in blue, red, green, white, brown, dark brown and yellow combined into steep colour diagonals running from right to left. All the compartments show finely serrated outlines. Their centres are accentuated by small stepped polygons. However, this motif has been omitted in three compartments in the second row from the top. We believe that this is not a coincidence, but a feature rooted in Islamic numerology. The lateral borders consist of a three-stripe serrated band – a dark brown outer one, a white central one and a polychrome inner one contrasting with the respective adjacent compartments. A narrow band of brown and white arrowheads separates the field from the wide striped elems. – Slight signs of age and wear, original finishes all around.

    Published:
    GALERIE NEIRIZ (Hrsg.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990,, Abb. 48 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 98 *** PARHAM, CYRUS, Masterpieces of Fars Rugs. Tehran 1996, Nr. 100 *** SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe o. J. (2014), Nr. 94

  • Qashqa’i Mowj

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    • Lot194
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions213 x 184 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 3,600
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 77

    Nearly square in format, this flatwoven cover in a vertical stripe design consists of two panels not exactly equal in width. Sadighi attributes it to the Shishboluki tribe, whereas Tanavoli does not specify a provenance in his HALI article discussing this group of flatweaves, "Waves from the Zagros" published in 1990. The stripes are patterned in complete stepped polygons or halved ones offset against them; the field is surrounded by a reciprocal trefoil border, and the ends are decorated with narrow horizontal stripes. The “tartan” effect typical of these weavings is particularly obvious in the end finishes. The complex weaving technique described as "balanced twill weave" by Tanavoli, which leaves both the warp and weft visible to combine into two-tone designs, has been explained in more detail for CP 76 (lot 182 in this catalogue). The term commonly used in Iran, "mowj" (wave) relates to the weaving technique and is considered so characteristic that it has become eponymous of the whole group. This is why Tanavoli argues in favour of abandoning the term "jajim" for these weavings. – Very good condition.

    Literature:
    TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, Tf. 216

    Published:
    TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Waves from the Zagros. In: HALI 52, 1990, Abb. S. 111 *** PARHAM, CYRUS, Tribal And Village Rugs From Fars (Persian Edition), Tehran 1992. Volume 2, Nr. 102 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 77 *** SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe o. J. (2014), Nr. 175

  • Bokhara Nim Suzani

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    • Lot195
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions150 x 100 cm
    • AgeCa. 1850 – 1875
    • Estimate EUR6,000 - 7,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 10

    Small embroideries are known as nim, a term derived from their half-sized format. It was customary to place a nim suzani on the cushions of the bridal bed as a decorative cover. Suzanis used for this purpose were known as "bolinpus" in Uzbekistan. – In this delightful Bokhara embroidery, the field is covered by a diamond lattice of slender pale green leaves. It encloses blossoms in different shades of red, represented either as large single motifs rendered in top or side view or as groups of two or four smaller side view blossoms; the latter combine into cruciform floral clusters. The composition is designed to produce diagonal bands of regularly alternating motifs. Blue irises have been incorporated into the design in many places and are also seen in the vine running through the narrow border, where their size has been skilfully adapted to the format so as not to distract from the field design. The embroidery technique using mainly basma stitch, the ornamental style and blazing colours strongly suggest that this suzani was made in the surroundings of Bokhara. – New overcasting along the sides, very good condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    HALI 43, 1989, S. 68 (Adv. Bernheimer, Maastricht Fair) *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 10

  • Bokhara Nim Suzani

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    • Lot196
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions140 x 110 cm
    • AgePre 1800
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 18,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 8

    A slightly curved diamond lattice of delicate golden lines covers the field of this small-format suzani. It encloses four-pointed blossoms embroidered in two shades of blue and decorated with eight serrated leaves all around so they resemble stars. The intersections of the diamonds are accentuated by small purple stars. The border is dominated by ten large blossoms composed of orange and purple segments, rendered either in top view as circular blossoms or in side view as fan-shaped palmettes. They are linked into a continuous design by a vine of lively diagonal stems with blue-green leaves. The golden spirals surrounding all ten flowers are an identifying feature of Bokhara embroideries; they are also found in large medallion suzanis. The embroidery techniques are another typical feature of the provenance – basma stitch for the blossoms, yurma chain stitch for the vines and ilmoq stitch for the outlines. – Very similar suzanis showing blue blossoms were made in Kermina, the summer residence of the emirs of Bokhara, but these appear to be later in date than this choice example in subtle shades and a wonderfully light and harmonious composition. It was the custom in Uzbek families to place small suzanis on the cushions of the bridal bed as decorative covers. Items used for this purpose were known as "bolinpus" in Uzbekistan. – Good condition, mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche IX. München 1987, Nr. 92 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, Auktion 70, 1. Dezember 2007, Lot 132 *** MELLER, SUSAN, Silk and Cotton. Textiles from the Central Asia that was. New York 2013, 2.3, Abb. S. 166

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 8