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VOK COLLECTION, Selection III

Saturday 25. March 2017 at 3 p.m.

94 Lots
  • Shakhrisyabz Suzani

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    • Lot237
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions310 x 220 cm
    • AgeCa. 1825 – 1850
    • Estimate EUR25,000 - 30,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 31

    This large suzani embroidered in the kanda khayol stitch in splendid colours is from Shakhrisyabz. A diamond lattice of deep green vines, decorated on both sides with the mushroom-shaped leaves that are typical of the provenance, covers the field in slightly irregular lines. In each diamond, a thin stem bears a large side-view blossom composed of five lancet-shaped leaves in pink and orange, with a delicate flowering stem at their tips. All the diamonds enclose the same motif; the otherwise common approach of two or three changing motifs has been avoided to create an overall expression of tranquility. Except for the small top-view circular blossoms placed on the intersections of the lattice, all the other flowers in the suzani are side-view fan-shaped versions, a feature rather rarely encountered in Shakhrisyabz suzanis. It is particularly striking in the main border, where twelve large fan-shaped blossoms alternately face inwards and outwards, pointing diagonally in the corners. They are surrounded by two petrol vines with ivy-shaped leaves. The spaces between them contain very long diagonal vines as connecting elements, embroidered in a brilliant light blue and with two diagonal flowering stems offset against them. Two suzanis sold by us belong to the same compositional type. – Very well preserved, backed with fabric, edged on the reverse with the original silk ikat bands.

    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, Auktionen A 55, 18. November 2000, Lot 115 und A 82, 25. Mai 2013, Lot 157

    Published:
    CHRISTIE'S South Kensington, Auktion 23. April 1990, Lot 245 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 31

  • Large Medallion Suzani

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    • Lot238
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions270 x 175 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800 or earlier
    • Estimate EUR28,000 - 33,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 1, 46

    “Large medallion” suzanis from Bokhara have a fascinating charisma. Their powerful, dynamic designs and blazing colours are impressive. A remarkable aspect is the diversity of their compositions which yet retain the same design vocabulary. For the collector Ignazio Vok, these stunning textiles held an appeal so great that he acquired eleven examples (nos. 11, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 77, 78 and 79 in his two suzani publications), meaning that he owned more large medallion suzanis than any other museum or private collection. – This large medallion suzani was assigned to group E and catalogued as E2 in Michael Franses’ monograph. A hexagonal, fully embroidered medallion enclosing a large cruciform motif occupies the centre of the narrow elongated field. At each end the medallion is framed by a pointed gable composed of two poles, and each corner of the field contains a blossom, either circular (top view) or fan-shaped (side view). A narrow frame-like band separates the field from the extra-wide border which invariably draws the eye. Sinuous “salamander“ designs (the zoomorphic nature of the motifs, with their heads and feet, is obvious) provide lively surrounds for ten huge, fully embroidered circular top-view and side-view blossoms. The golden spirals encircling five of the blossoms are considered a distinctive stylistic feature of these Bokhara suzanis. – Good condition, backed with a white fabric.

    Literature:
    BLACK, DAVID & LOVELESS, CLIVE, Embroidered Flowers From Thrace To Tartary. London 1981, Nr. 20

    Published:
    CHRISTIE'S New York, Auktion 9. April 1988, # 64 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 46 *** FRANSES, MICHAEL, The Great Embroideries of Bukhara. London 2000, E2

  • Shakhrisyabz Suzani

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    • Lot239
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions270 x 212 cm
    • AgePre 1750
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 35,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 2, 69

    Four creepers composed of thin petrol vines forming circles and ovals create an ascending design in the field. The design bands are slightly offset rather than running exactly in parallel. Decorated with small hooks and mushroom-shaped leaves, the vines bear sizeable lancet leaves with serrated outlines, blossoms and delicate flowering stems. The primary designs of the composition are integrated into this basic framework – twenty large blossoms aligned vertically, alternately presented in top view as circular blossoms or in side view as fan-shaped palmettes. The widely spaced surrounding vines never enclose them completely, creating a breezy and transparent effect in the composition which is further enhanced by the asymmetrical arrangement of the blossoms. The fan-shaped palmettes, composed of diverging segments in pale colours, are attached to long slender stems. Embroidered in subtle shades of pink and orange with blue centres, the circular blossoms are all open star shapes drawn in different ways, with the exception of one closed blossom at the top left. The light and floating design holds a peculiar charm; the large blossoms appear like colourful balloons rising to the sky. Embroidered in the kanda khayol surface stitch, this rare suzani was probably made in Shakhrisyabz or its surroundings. It may be the oldest embroidery in the Vok Collection. – Signs of age and wear. Backed with fabric.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 1. München 1989, Nr. 58

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jacob Taube). München 2006, Nr. 69

  • Sileh Flatweave

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    • Lot240
    • OriginSouth Caucasus, Azerbaijan
    • Dimensions282 x 188 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 28

    This large sileh flatweave with a dragon design in the sumakh technique was woven in a single piece. Woven rugs presenting the mythological dragon design are traditionally called "sileh", a term probably derived from the name “zilu” (pronounced zili) commonly used in the Caucasus. While Sadighi writes that silehs always served as floor coverings, Tanavoli describes the sileh CP 33 as a “pardeh” in a 2002 publication, believing it to be a decorative cover used as a wall hanging or dividing curtain. – Opinions are divided regarding the provenance of silehs. They appear to have been made in different regions of the eastern and southern Caucasus, and accurate criteria for distinguishing among them are currently not available. Wright and Wertime assume a provenance in the Jebrail district of Karabagh for an example published by them, which they call “verni” and consider an Azeri weaving. – The Vok sileh CP 33 differs from other examples in the group in three respects: its foundation is midnight blue (in most silehs it is red and seldom white); it is considerably finer in weave; and the sixteen dragon figures, alternately red and white (cotton) have been given four legs, effectively appearing to walk. The only other known dragon figures with legs occur in kilims from Daghestan, an area far further north (see article in HALI). While the dragon designs often present a nearly square outline, their elongated shape in this item and in a sileh published by Boralevi is striking. – The auspicious celestial dragon is an ancient Chinese motif encountered in imperial carpets and textiles. Trade in Chinese silks along the Silk Road probably took it as far as the Caucasus, where it was known from the 16th century at the latest. It is found in prominent places in the large-format Azerbaijani 17th century workshop carpets. – Very good condition, only minimal repairs.

    Literature:
    WRIGHT, RICHARD & WERTIME, JOHN, Caucasian Carpets & Covers. The Weaving Culture. London 1995, XVII *** RAMSEY, PAUL, The Dragon Dums of Daghestan. In: HALI 89, 1996, S. 88 ff. *** BORALEVI, ALBERTO, Sumakh. Flat-Woven carpets of the Caucasus. Florenz 1986, Nr. 6

    Published:
    SOTHEBY'S London, Auktion 13. April 1988, Lot 66 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 33 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, 188

  • Davagin Kilim

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    • Lot241
    • OriginNorth East Caucasus, Daghestan
    • Dimensions511 x 160 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR6,000 - 8,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 15

    This long Daghestan kilim is an Avar piece. The midnight blue field is entirely taken up by two huge shields, symmetrically conceived in mirror image and composed of a central box with octagonal ends surrounded by a wide white outline. Known as “orduch”, this distinctive design is often encountered in pile rugs from the Kuba region where a particular group is named after it (Orduch Konagkend). It also appears in some Kazaks with the “shield” design, but is rather rare in Daghestan kilims. A similar piece is in a museum in Daghestan. – The primary design evokes associations of Persian garden carpets showing paths, beds and a water basin; however, it could also represent one of the tomb steles still seen in cemeteries in present-day Daghestan, highly stylised and doubled in mirror image. In terms of iconography, this interpretation would fit in with the design seen in the octagons – a diamond decorated with double hooks, an ancient symbol known as “wheel of heaven” in Daghestan. – The characteristic features of Avar kilims are their long and narrow format; their reduced colour range mainly comprising different shades of blue, red and green as well as white, yellow and brown; their austere style of drawing; large-scale and spacious compositions always presenting an elongated vine in the outer border; and, naturally, the weaving structure using single weft interlocking, with finely serrated sawtooth-like outlines and “lazy lines” in the foundation. – Two white woven characters appear between the two primary motifs on the left and right; although almost impossible to decipher, they may be dates denoting years. In the hypothetical case that the date reads “1299”, it would translate as 1881 AD. A stylistic comparison of this kilim and other examples with an assured date in the 1870 to 1880 period shows that CP 15 is datable to this period, i.e. the late 19th century. Specialists consulted by us assume that the kilim was made in the small town of Buynaksk or the district of Khunzakh. – Signs of age and wear, rewoven areas in the red sections, damaged sides, good overall condition.

    Literature:
    АЙШАТ МАГОМЕДОВА, Дагестанские ковры. из собрания ДМИИ им Патимат Гамзатовой. Махачкала 2009, стр.40 = AJSCHAT MAGOMEDOVA, Dagestanische Teppiche . Aus Sammlung dagestanisches Museum Patimat Gamsatovoj. Machachkala 2009, S. 40

    Published:
    CHRISTIE'S EAST New York, 12. Mai 1986, Lot 71 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 15

  • Bakhtiari Kilim

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    • Lot242
    • OriginWestern Central Persia, Chahar Mahal region
    • Dimensions397 x 196 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,500
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 48

    This single-panel Bakhtiari kilim was woven in one of the villages of the Chahar Mahal region. Many of the tribes living there led semi-nomadic lives until well into the 20th century. In the early summer of each year, when it became so hot that the meadows dried out and the animals ran out of water, the clans would leave the plains and migrate with their large herds to the cooler regions of the Zagros Mountains. A migration of this kind was impressively documented in an early silent movie made in 1925, "Grass: A Nation's Battle for Life”. In the autumn the clans would return to their villages where large looms were available for the production of carpets and kilims. – Coarsely woven all in wool, this very heavy kilim was used as a floor covering in one of the village homes. It shows an abstract field design of 37 narrow vertical bands of sharp and slightly curved points in a rich range of colours. The points interlock in the zip fastener style, combining into a surface design of hermetic density in lively and diverse colours. Lacking accentuation of any kind, it is rarely encountered in this form. A narrow border of reciprocal trefoils in brown and white surrounds the field. – Good condition, original finishes all around.

    Literature:
    TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, Tf. 107

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 48

  • Varamin Kilim

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    • Lot243
    • OriginNorth Persia
    • Dimensions425 x 172 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 3,600
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 50

    This long, single-panel all-wool kilim woven in the weft interlocking technique is from a village in the Varamin area, possibly Garmsar. During the 19th century, various nomadic tribes settled in the Varamin region situated some 40 kilometres south east of Tehran, originally for political reasons. Due to mutual influences resulting from intermarriage among the tribes, it is difficult to arrive at precise ethnological attributions for Varamin kilims. This kilim may be the work of a Luri weaver. The brown warps, subdued palette of reds, browns, ochres, greens and blues and the firm texture support this assumption. The effect of the composition is powerful and dynamic. Diagonal bands of sharply serrated forms lined up in rows combine into concentric diamonds of colour diagonals which increasingly expand towards the sides like ripples on a water surface. This confusing, apparently vibrating tile design, known as "eye dazzler" in English publications, is structured by two huge white diamonds, indicating how it should be read. However, the vertical tips of the two large forms do not touch as is usual in this kilim type because a smaller diamond has been inserted between them, affecting the run of the whole design and creating a complex undulating movement. Antique Varamin kilims were woven without vertical borders, and only the ends are separated from the field by narrow elems. Very similar kilims were woven by the Qashqa’i and Khamseh tribes of Fars. Usually finer in weave and, accordingly, thinner in structure, they show a greater diversity of colour. – Slight signs of age and wear, somewhat thin in places, one darned area, minor stains.

    Literature:
    GALERIE NEIRIZ (Hrsg.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990, Abb. 57 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, Tf. 92 *** PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. München 1980, Nr. 379

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 50 *** SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe o. J. (2014), Nr. 69

  • Sivas Kilim

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    • Lot244
    • OriginEastern Central Anatolia, Cappadocia
    • Dimensions364 x 144 cm
    • AgeEarly 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,200
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 41

    Few Anatolian flatweaves dispense with decorative devices as completely as this rare kilim from the surroundings of Sivas. The design is purely abstract and composed entirely from geometric forms and colour sections. A panel in colours ranging from light red to purple red is aligned on the central axis of a field woven in changing shades of blue, green and turquoise. Its horizontal parmakli outlines protrude and recede in line with the analogous red-brown outlines along the sides of the field, relating to them across the empty ground. This interaction generates a palpable tension. The different lengths of the parallel outlines create an effect of shading in the design. The field design continues in the two end panels composed of four horizontal stripes, their ground colours repeated in mirror image. The inner purple-ground stripes – the only ones with a white parmakli motif at their centres – divide the kilim into three sections. Misalignment of the design along the central axis, a phenomenon frequently observed in two-panel kilims, has created asymmetric forms that appear dynamic and restless, generating a sense of vibration throughout the field. Strange and mysterious to our eyes, the kilim served as a wall decoration on festive occasions. We are not aware of any comparative pieces. – Incomplete sides and ends, missing sections. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 41

  • Canakkale Niche Kilim

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    • Lot245
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia, Marmara region
    • Dimensions440 x 144 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800 or earlier
    • Estimate EUR6,000 - 7,500
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 24

    Kilims showing double niche designs were woven in many Anatolian regions, but there are significant differences in terms of style, palette and the use of individual designs specific to particular locations. This two-panel Canakkale kilim displays six plain green-, red- or aubergine-ground panels containing double niches. Their arches are decorated with parmakli designs extending far into the white-ground sections at the sides. Two facing fork shapes attached to thin long poles – stylised oil lamps – are the only motifs seen in the niches. The six panels are separated by sets of three horizontal stripes. The fork shapes of the inner stripes may represent abstract birds. – Always cautious when determining age, Hirsch assumes a mid 19th century date. Judging from the quality of the drawing and colours, we believe that the kilim could have been made ca. 1800 or earlier. A fragmented kilim of the same group was exhibited in Basel in 1997. Two examples published by Cootner and Wolff-Diepenbrock belong to the same group. – Obvious signs of age and wear, missing sections; the side finishes have largely been lost. Mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    RAGETH, JÜRG (Hrsg.), Anatolian Kilims & Radiocarbon Dating. A New Approach to Dating Anatolian Kilims. (Ausstell. Kantonsmuseum Baselland, Liestal) Riehen 1999, Tf. 19 *** COOTNER, CATHRYN & MUSE, GARRY, Anatolian Kilims. The Caroline & H. McCoy Jones Collection. San Francisco-London 1990, Tf. 15 *** WOLFF-DIEPENBROCK, JOHANNES (Hrsg.), Eine Sammlung. Textilien aus Anatolien, dem Kaukasus, Persien, Mittelasien, Zentral- und Ostafrika. Köln 2009, Tf. S. 77

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 24

  • Karakuzulu Kilim

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    • Lot246
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Manisa province
    • Dimensions346 x 200 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 6,000
    VOK Collection: Anatolia 72

    According to Hirsch, this unusually wide two-panel kilim is a Karakuzulu weaving from the West Anatolian province of Manisa. It was first published by Eskenazi and Valcarenghi, but at the time attributed to the Aydinli tribe in the exhibition catalogue. Böhmer, who has published one of the few comparative examples, assumes a provenance in the province of Burdur further to the south west. – The primary motif, a large nested hexagon decorated with long arms ending in hooks or double hooks, is frequently encountered in kilims from West and Central Anatolia. At present we are unable to establish whether it is Turkmen in origin, as some authors believe. – The enormous size of the two designs in this red-ground kilim is surprising. They take up all the space at the bottom and top ends of the field. Their massive blue-and-white outlines extend like tentacles. Two different designs have been placed between them at the centre of the field – vertical forms of merging blue diamonds outlined in sprawling arms with double hooks. They are separated from the two large devices by two rows of four hexagons each. The striking border – two vertical bands decorated with arrowheads and two horizontal bands containing X-forms – creates an impressive visual effect. The narrow elems are composed of three horizontal stripes containing bird motifs. – Largely rewoven end and side finishes, several restored sections in the field.

    Literature:
    BÖHMER, HARALD, Nomaden in Anatolien. Begegnungen mit einer ausklingenden Kultur. Ganderkesee 2004, Abb. S. 231 links *** RIPPON BOSWELL, Auktion 35, 28. März 1992, Lot 109

    Published:
    ESKENAZI, JOHN & VALCARENGHI, DARIO, Kilim anatolici. Mailand 1985, Nr. 18 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims und andere Flachgewebe aus Anatolien. (Text: Udo Hirsch) München 1997, Nr. 72