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VOK COLLECTION, Selection III

Saturday 25. March 2017 at 3 p.m.

94 Lots
  • Kurdish Kilim

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    • Lot257
    • OriginEast Anatolia, Malatya region
    • Dimensions406 x 129 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus - Persia 3

    Finely and meticulously woven, this two-panel slit tapestry is a Kurdish piece probably made in the surroundings of Malatya. Three vertical panels of equal width – a white-ground central band and two red-ground outer bands – fill the entire field. Their design is a regular succession of large cartouches with striking serrated outlines, hexagons and hooked diamonds enclosing bold cross motifs and nested hooked diamonds reminiscent of tarantulas. Many small filler motifs are randomly distributed around them. The weaver has managed the feat of avoiding misalignment of the design halves so common in two-panel kilims with designs going across both panels. In this item, the primary motifs fit together so well that the seam at the centre of the field is initially not even noticeable. The border is a narrow white-ground band of small hexagons, most of them enclosing arrow shapes. A stylised human figure has been incorporated into their sequence in one place. Outstanding in palette and drawing, this very rare kilim is a particularly beautiful example. Its good condition proves that it has always been viewed as such and cherished accordingly.

    Literature:
    BÖHMER, HARALD, Nomaden in Anatolien. Begegnungen mit einer ausklingenden Kultur. Ganderkesee 2004, Abb. S. 237 rechts

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 3

  • East Anatolian Kilim

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    • Lot258
    • OriginEast Anatolia, Erzurum – Bayburt region
    • Dimensions317 x 200 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus - Persia 4

    Woven in a village workshop in the Erzurum-Bayburt region, this large slit tapestry may be a Kurdish piece. Its palette, style of drawing and soft and supple handle are typical features of kilims from that area (most of them small-format pieces showing niche designs). The red field is almost completely filled by huge diamonds in green, purple, blue, dusky pink and two different shades of brown. The infinite nature of the design is emphasised by halved motifs at both ends of the field and cut motifs at its sides. The diamonds have stepped outlines and bear double hooks at their tips. Their interior drawing consists of a large cross decorated with tulips and carnations and flanked by four hooked motifs. The floral designs were borrowed from the Ottoman design repertoire and slightly modified to translate them into the geometric style of a village weaver. They are therefore not originally Anatolian, but inspired by a later urban court tradition. The only typically Anatolian design is the double hooks reminiscent of elibelinde figures which adorn the narrow border. This rare and expressive kilim was sold at a Lefevre auction in 1980 and published by Herrmann in 1982. – Several rewoven sections, now in very good condition, the original finishes are intact all around.

    Literature:
    BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, Nr. 70

    Published:
    LEFREVRE, Auktion in London 25. April 1980, Lot 4 *** HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche IV. München 1982, Nr. 13 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 4

  • Kermina Suzani

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    • Lot259
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions247 x 179 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800 – 1825
    • Estimate EUR20,000 - 25,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 2, 62

    This top-quality Kermina embroidery in magnificent colours is very finely worked in the yurma chain stitch throughout. The direction of the stitches matches the shape of the respective segments in the blossoms, enlivening the surfaces in subtle ways. The field design consists of blossoms in various shapes and sizes, some rendered in top view and some in side view. They are surrounded by green vines, small blossoms and buds. The structure of the design derives from two long diagonal vines running from the corners across the entire length of the field, changing direction to produce a widely spaced diamond lattice with two halved forms at the ends of the field, four halved diamonds along its sides and a large unit at its centre, where a cruciform floral cluster constitutes the focal point of the composition. All the large blossoms are embroidered in predominant shades of red and purple, with details in pink, blue, apricot and pale green. In the main border, eighteen large circular and star-shaped blossoms are accompanied by vines with ivy-like leaves. The delicate style of drawing of the secondary borders, with blossoms in a brilliant cornflower blue, suggests that this suzani was made in Kermina. – Very good condition. Backed with fabric.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jacob Taube). München 2006, Nr. 62

  • Karshi Suzani

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    • Lot260
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions263 x 195 cm
    • AgeCa. 1750 – 1800
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 35,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 35

    This very rare suzani must have been made in the vicinity of Karshi as this is the only place where double surrounds of two vines are seen around the large disc-shaped blossoms. Most of the embroidery is finely worked in the ilmoq technique and almost exclusively in silk yarn; however, several motifs have sections embroidered in vermilion wool. The extraordinarily elaborate design, precisely drawn down to the smallest detail, stands out almost three-dimensionally from the mauve silk foundation, creating a vibrant effect that is captivating. Since the designs and colours of the field and border are largely consistent, this suzani does not display the clear separation of the two sections otherwise common; they seem to merge into one another, and the inner secondary border surrounding the field appears to be superimposed. The comparatively small field displays a four-and-one design. The central circular blossom is surrounded by a double ring of delicate leaf vines, with four outer diagonal palmettes branching away from it. Four further circular blossoms with an interior design of stars or spokes have been placed in the corners of the field. The design of the unusually wide main border consists of six disc-shaped blossoms with double surrounds alternating with diagonal crosses composed of five blossoms – a prominent motif of Shakhrisyabz suzanis which supposedly symbolises the eternal burning lamp to ward off the powers of darkness. The centres of the crosses always show a circular top-view blossom; the flowers linked to it by short diagonal stems are either smaller circular blossoms or side-view fan-shaped palmettes. The interior drawing of the border designs is amazingly rich in variation. The points of the stars contain small water jugs or serrated designs, and the style of some of the rotating motifs is strongly reminiscent of nomad embroideries by the Lakai tribe. The blossoms and leaves of the outer secondary border are drawn in a highly unusual style which is familiar from late medieval European textiles. All these elements combine into an overwhelming overall effect of magic beauty which eludes description, and can only be experienced when viewing the actual object. – Slight signs of wear in the foundation, partially repaired. Otherwise well preserved. Backed with fabric.

    Literature:
    GRUBE, ERNST J., Keshte. Central Asian Embroideries. The Marshall and Marilyn R. Wolf Collection. New York 2003, Nr. 32

    Published:
    CHRISTIE'S London, Auktion 10. März 1988, Lot 12 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 35

  • Kermina Suzani

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    • Lot261
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions170 x 117 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800 or earlier
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 35,000
    VOK Collection: Suzani 24

    Many suzani designs include small animals, often peacocks or other birds; the Vok suzani 12 even displays a large-format tiger and elephant. However, fully developed fish drawn in a naturalistic style are extremely rare. Consequently, this Kermina suzani caused quite a stir when published by Vok in 1994 and has been known as “The Fish Pond” ever since. Three further pieces of similar design are known in addition to the Vok suzani, one of them published by Eskenazi. – Shaped like an eight-pointed star, the fish pond at the centre of the composition is an empty space except for the central circular blossom and the small floral motifs radially associated with it. Its corners are decorated with palmettes. Eight blue or silvery grey-blue fish jump over the indented sides of the pond in all directions. They are very long and slim, with fins and red bones showing through their bodies. The slightly curved shapes of the fish convey a movement reminiscent of flying fish images. Twelve further fish, some of them considerably smaller, are grouped around the main design, most of them swimming towards the four smaller ponds faintly suggested in the corners of the field. The cool colours – primarily shades of blue, with only a few designs in red, beige and ivory to accentuate the composition – are perfectly in line with the theme of water and fish. The vine design of the border, with four-pointed top-view blossoms and silvery side-view flowers, is a typical feature of Kermina embroideries and thus an indication regarding the provenance of the suzani. – Slight signs of age and wear, good overall condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    ESKENAZI, JOHN, Suzani. Ausstellungsbroschüre Mailand 1995, Nr. 20. Tf. S. 9

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. Eine textile Kunst aus Zentralasien. (Text: Jakob Taube) München 1994, Nr. 24

  • Dragon Sumakh

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    • Lot262
    • OriginEast Caucasus, Khanate of Kuba
    • Dimensions310 x 190 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800
    • Estimate EUR10,000 - 13,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 33

    During the second half of the 19th century, many dragon design sumakhs were woven in the workshops of the Kuba region. Production steadily increased due to rising demand from Western countries, where rooms furnished in oriental carpets were considered the proper thing among the wealthy bourgeoisie. Boralevi discovered that the town of Kusary situated between Kuba and Zeikhur was an important centre of production. The Vok dragon sumakh CP 33 has nothing in common with these late pieces, which had begun to display degenerate designs and frequently employed chemical dyes. It is one of the early pieces dating from ca. 1800, when Kuba was still an independent khanate. Pile rugs presenting dragon figures had been woven in the Caucasus since the 16th century, and various examples of them have survived. It is assumed that the dragon sumakh type harks back to such models. Drawn in the characteristic geometric style of sumakhs, the design is still freely and spaciously arranged in the red field, with a row of trees constituting the vertical axis of a mirror image composition. Animals and plants drawn in different degrees of abstraction have been added. Herrmann, who published the sumakh in 1990, interpreted the iconography in a new light. – Slight signs of age and wear, minor repairs, good overall condition.

    Literature:
    BURNS, JAMES D., The Caucasus. Traditions in Weaving. Seattle 1987, Nr. 51 *** SPUHLER, FRIEDRICH, KÖNIG, HANS & VOLKMANN, MARTIN, Alte Orientteppiche. Meisterstücke aus deutschen Privatsammlungen. München 1978, Nr. 60

    Published:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 2. München 1990, Nr. 33 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 33

  • Azeri Zili

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    • Lot263
    • OriginSouth Caucasus, Azerbaijan, Karabagh region
    • Dimensions191 x 149 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,500
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 20

    This brocaded flatweave with a colourful compartment design is woven in a single piece, with braided red warps at both ends. The 24 compartments, each with a central box motif surrounded by small dots, have been placed on a polychrome ground divided at regular intervals into small squares enclosing diamonds, creating a wide grid around the compartments. – Known as "vernehs" in the past, the decorative covers woven by the Azeri of the southern Caucasus are described as "zilis" in more recent publications. In an article published in ORR in 1990, Wright points out that a flatweave from the same group was called "Shusha Zili" in the catalogue of an exhibition held in Petrograd as early as 1913. Consequently, in a 1995 publication Wright and Wertime state Shusha, the capital of the Karabagh region, as the provenance of a zili closely related to CP 20. This very beautiful example in harmonious colours represents the small-format and nearly square type. Most of the compartment zilis are substantially larger, and sizes of two by four metres are not rare but rather standard (see the example in the "Orient Stars" Collection). Zilis identical in design were also woven in East Anatolia; however, they have dark blue warps, making them easy to distinguish from Caucasian zilis which have red warps. – Slight signs of wear, good overall condition.

    Literature:
    WRIGHT, RICHARD, On the Origin of Caucasian village Rugs. In: Oriental Rug Review Review, Vol. 10, No. 4. Meredith, NH 1990, S. 47, Fig. 7 *** WRIGHT, RICHARD & WERTIME, JOHN, Caucasian Carpets & Covers. The Weaving Culture. London 1995, Tf. XVI *** SPUHLER, FRIEDRICH, KÖNIG, HANS & VOLKMANN, MARTIN, Alte Orientteppiche. Meisterstücke aus deutschen Privatsammlungen. München 1978, Nr. 34 *** WILLBORG, PETER, & ALBERTSON, INGEMAR, Woven Magic. A Book About Kilims. Stockholm 1992, Nr. 45 *** ÖLÇER, NAZAN, Museum Of Turkish And Islamic Art: KILIMS. Istanbul 1989, Nr. 64 *** KIRCHHEIM, E. HEINRICH, Orient Stars. Eine Teppichsammlung. Stuttgart-London 1993, Nr. 35

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 20

  • Qashqa’i Kilim

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    • Lot264
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions257 x 146 cm
    • AgeCa. 1900
    • Estimate EUR2,500 - 3,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 85

    The plain field in changing shades of orange and apricot is framed to great effect by blue trefoils with finely stepped outlines, creating a serrated outline. The striking double hooks protruding into the field from the tips of the triangular trefoils are a rare motif. The appearance of this simple composition is defined by the contrast of light and dark colours between the inner and outer sections and the sharply pointed shape of the trefoils. The border of two-tone zigzag bands and an inner row of stepped reciprocal trefoils in white (cotton) and blue-black belong to the standard repertoire of kilims from Fars. They are encountered in the same form in Luri weavings. – Sadighi attributes the kilim to the Kashkuli tribe and believes that this finely woven example was commissioned from particularly talented weavers by the wife of a khan as a gift to her husband. He writes that weavings of this kind were known as "bibi baf" in Iran. A kilim from the Kossow Collection, identical in composition but different in colour, was first published by Plötze. The author assumes that it served as an eating cloth (sofreh). – Good condition, with the original finishes all around and braided warps at both ends.

    Literature:
    PLÖTZE, KARL-MICHAEL, Welt der Kelims. Barsinghausen 2001, Nr. 4

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 85

  • Qashqa’i Kilim

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    • Lot265
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions322 x 163 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR4,000 - 5,000
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 104

    Two colourful diamond-shaped medallions densely filled with concentric, nested, finely stepped colour bands, creating further diamonds in their turn, are aligned along the central axis of the white cotton field. The corners of the medallions are accentuated by small diamonds, and their central motifs are a spider gül and a stepped polygon – a differentiation that is probably not a coincidence, expressing a message unknown to us. The two central motifs are surrounded by design chains of small red diamonds echoing the outline of the primary motifs and intersecting at the exact centre of the field. – Large-format Qashqa’i kilims of this kind are said to have been made for the clan chiefs. Sadighi therefore describes CP 104 as a khan kilim, attributing it to the Darreh Shuri tribe. The most striking features are the huge diamond halves seen at the sides of the field and the equally huge triangular shapes in the field corners; like the two medallions, they are composed of multiple stepped diagonal bands in diverse colours. The design of wavy lines probably symbolises water, an element of vital importance for the nomads’ survival. The border contains reciprocal green trefoils on a red ground, a rather rare variation of this classic Qashqa’i border in which blue and white trefoils are far more common. Three very similar comparative examples showing two or three primary motifs can be found in literature. – Very good condition, original finishes all around, only small repaired areas.

    Literature:
    SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe o. J. (2014), Nrn. 128 und 129 *** OPIE, JAMES, Tribal Rugs. Nomadic and Village Weavings from the Near East and Central Asia. Portland 1992, Abb. 7.15

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 104 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, TF. 143

  • Zili Flatweave

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    • Lot266
    • OriginNorth East Anatolia
    • Dimensions180 x 135 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,500
    VOK Collection: Caucasus – Persia 19

    This single-panel cover showing a brocaded design on a blue plainweave foundation is a masterpiece of Oriental surface decoration. A rectangular grid of fine red-and-white lines divides the field into squares; they contain diamonds composed of four triangles each, associated diagonally by colour change and enclosing a hooked design. The changing colours of the diamond quarters create a composition of offset horizontal rows of diamonds. Alternatively, the design could be read as large squares composed of four compartments divided by a diagonal cross of vines. A characteristic feature of such flatweaves, this ambivalence is always particularly striking when the design has been drawn with an almost mathematical precision and regularity like this choice example. The Azeri of the southern Caucasus produced similar flatweaves, but they usually employed red warps. The blue warps of this item have been braided into decorative plaits at both ends. – Good condition.

    Literature:
    BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, Tf. 88

    Published:
    FRAUENKNECHT, BERTRAM, Frühe türkische Tapisserien. Nürnberg 1984, Tf. 62 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim und andere Flachgewebe. (Text: Hamid Sadighi) München 1996, Nr. 19