Sprachauswahl
Language

Major Spring Auction

Saturday 29. May 2010 at 3 p.m.

292 Lots
    • Lot31
    • OriginSouth East Caucasus
    • Dimensions281 x 126 cm
    • AgeCa. 1900
    • Estimate EUR4,200
    A pretty Akstafa with four star medallions, mythological birds arranged in pairs, flowering trees and many filler motifs. The white-ground border shows a leaf and calyx design rather than the typical hooks. Original finishes all around, good overall condition.
    • Lot32
    • OriginEast Caucasus, Kuba region
    • Dimensions259 x 142 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR4,700
    A red-ground chichi with a narrow field containing horizontal rows of hooked polygons alternating with octagons filled with stars. An extra-wide border area of seven stripes. Original sides, both ends somewhat reduced. Good overall condition, several small repairs.

    Literature:
    EDER, DORIS, Orientteppiche. Vol. 1: Kaukasische Teppiche. Munich 1979, no. 359

    • Lot33
    • OriginSouth West Caucasus
    • Dimensions214 x 155 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR4,800
    A rare Kazak type with a red field. Three box shapes enclosing hooked cartouches have been placed along the central axis. Several repiled areas, now in very good condition.
  • Moldavian Kilim

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot34
    • OriginSouth East Europe
    • Dimensions270 x 186 cm
    • AgeCa. 1900
    • Estimate EUR3,000
    A decorative kilim from the Moldova region, with a spaciously designed floral pattern of robust vines and flowers. A large circular blossom accentuates the centre of the beige-ground field. Original finishes all around, good condition.
    • Lot35
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia, Bergama region
    • Dimensions193 x 155 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,500
    This rug from the Bergama region was probably woven in Canakkale, a coastal town on the Dardanelles, where the striking design has a long-standing tradition. The sea-green central medallion has been placed on a brick-red ground and framed by two huge, dark blue gables. Hooked triangles filled with triangles and arrows in mosaic style mark the corners. The white border shows cruciform leaves. Cut sides, replaced cords, reduced ends. Low pile, various repairs.

    Literature:
    NEUGEBAUER, RUDOLF & TROLL, SIEGFRIED, Handbuch der orientalischen Teppichkunde. Leipzig 1930, pl. 44 B *** EILAND, MURRAY (ed.), Oriental Rugs from Pacific Collections. San Francisco 1990, no. 37 a, p. 65

  • Moldavian Kilim

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot36
    • OriginSouth East Europe
    • Dimensions275 x 176 cm
    • AgeCa. 1900
    • Estimate EUR2,500
    A village kilim made in the Moldova region, with a sand-brown field containing a repeat of large flowering plants placed in rows of four. In the wide, beige-ground border, an undulating vine of strikingly serrated contours intersects with a green vine of leaves and blossoms that undulates in the opposite direction. A narrow, earth-brown, undecorated edge. Good condition, only slight damage to the ends.
  • Belgian Carpet

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot37
    • OriginEurope, Belgium
    • Dimensions396 x 306 cm
    • AgeCa. 1930
    • Estimate EUR2,300
    A coarsely woven, very heavy Belgian workshop carpet showing a dense repeat of sweeping, green diagonal branches with abundant flowers and large leaves on a black ground. The design emulates French models dating from the late Renaissance. Very well preserved, original finishes all around.
  • Ottoman Embroidery

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot38
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions75 x 80 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,200
    Silk embroidery on a gauze-like linen ground composed of two panels. Four sweeping twigs have been decorated with carnations and hyacinths. Several holes and stains.
    • Lot39
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia, Bergama region
    • Dimensions140 x 85 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,500
    The village of Kozak, situated north of Bergama, chiefly produced small-format carpets with geometric designs reminiscent of Caucasian weavings. It inhabitants are said to have migrated there from the Kazak region. Two blue box shapes decorated with four arrows, reminiscent of certain Shahsavan gül designs, are aligned on the central axis of the light red field. Similar ornaments, halved or quartered by the border, are offset against these. The reciprocal effects produced by this arrangement create a complex overall appearance through simple means. The leaf and calyx vine in the white-ground border is purely Caucasian in character. The dot knotted into the upper kilim finish has a symbolic meaning: it assumes the character of an amulet to ward off evil from the owner. Completely preserved with the original finishes all around and a high pile, some damage to the kilims.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche 4. Munich 1982, no. 10

  • Turkmen Tent Band Fragment

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot40
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions365 x 29 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,200
    Attribution of Turkmen tent bands to specific tribes seems to become more difficult, not easier, as the number of comparative pieces increases. Since most bands are made in the same technique, with pile-woven designs on a flatwoven, white warp-faced plainweave ground, we lack the important feature of knot type to distinguish between them. To date, comparisons of their designs have not produced definite results that would allow attribution to a particular tribe, because tent bands use a specific design repertoire adapted to their long, narrow format that obviously developed to suit this type of weaving. With some distinctive exceptions (Eagle groups), different tribes appear to have used the same or similar motifs. For this reason, and due to their wealth of motifs, it is difficult to gain an overview of their designs; however, stylistic idiosyncracies in drawing, division of space and composition can be noted. The tent bands have yet to be catalogued in order to provide a basis for a comparative study. In this beautiful jolami fragment, the colours appear darker than usual in contrast to the flatwoven, white cotton ground. The cotton ground indicates that the band may be a Chodor or Arabachi weaving. Signs of age and wear, but in good overall condition.