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Zaleski Collection

Saturday 30. November 2019 at 3 p.m.

162 Lots
    • Lot31
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions187 x 34 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,800
    This cochineal silk velvet ikat panel from Bokhara shows two rows of white and yellow oval forms which differ in design and are arranged in an alternating sequence. Small diamonds have been placed in the spaces left undecorated by the main design. Intensely luminous colours. – Original selvedges at the sides, cut at both ends. Good condition. Mounted and attached to a wooden frame.
    • Lot32
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions139 x 33 cm
    • AgeSecond third 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,800
    The workshops of Bokhara were famed for their precious and sumptuous silk velvet ikats. The long and narrow fabric panels were later made up into coats for men and women of high social standing. Preserved in its original width, but reduced in length, this ikat is captivating due to the intensity of its luminous, jewel-like colours. A complete coat decorated with a similar design of hexagons is illustrated in the book on the Goldman Collection. – Mounted and attached to a wooden frame, very good condition.

    Literature:
    FITZ GIBBON, KATE & HALE, ANDREW, Ikat. Silks of Central Asia. The Guido Goldman Collection. London 1997, Nr.159

    • Lot33
    • OriginSouth West Caucasus
    • Dimensions203 x 152 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR6,500
    A red-ground Karachov woven in a four-and-one medallion design using blue wefts. The very large, octagonal central motif enclosing a smaller green octagon shows a rare interior drawing of double hooks. The design of the white-ground main border – halved diamonds with serrated outlines in an alternating rhythm, separated by diagonal hooked vines – is only encountered in Karachovs as a matter of exception. – Signs of age and wear, major repairs and repiled sections; the sides and ends have been largely repiled.
    • Lot34
    • OriginSouth West Caucasus
    • Dimensions190 x 128 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,500
    This white-ground Kazak presents a kilim-style field design of slightly chaotic appearance, composed of hooked diamonds in varying sizes and many randomly scattered filler motifs. The secondary borders feature a striking design of small colourful triangles. This rustic-looking rug was undoubtedly made for home use. – Rewoven sides, partially original ends, various minor repairs, pile in fairly good condition.

    Literature:
    BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike Orientteppiche. Braunschweig 1978, Tf. S.175

    • Lot35
    • OriginSouth West Caucasus
    • Dimensions52 x 108 cm
    • AgeLate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR2,000
    The exact purpose of this miniature pile rug woven in a rare horizontal format is unknown. It may have been the face of a mafrash whose remaining sections were flatwoven. The field is hermetically filled with dots and tiny squares, and a central diamond and two elongated honeycomb-shaped hexagons enclosing tree motifs are superimposed on this basic design. The honeycomb motifs and border drawing suggest that this rug belongs to the Borjalou Kazak group. – Slight signs of wear, the corroded brown sections in the border have been partially repiled.

    Literature:
    STONE, PETER (Hrsg.), Mideast Meets Midwest. Ethnographic Rugs From Midwest Collections. Chicago 1993, Nr.7 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 68, 18.11.2006, #75 *** TSCHEBULL, RAOUL E., Qarajeh to Quba. Rugs and Flatweaves from East Azarbayjan and the Transcaucasus. London 2019, Nr.36

  • Shahsavan Mafrash Side Panel

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    • Lot36
    • OriginSouth East Caucasus, Moghan-Savalan region
    • Dimensions48 x 94 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,600
    A side panel of a Moghan Shahsavan mafrash, finely woven in the sumakh technique. The wide central band contains three large Memling güls embedded in white octagons, with small animals and tiny blossoms distributed around them. The border configuration is identical in all the pieces of this special group: the white main border featuring abstract animal figures is always flanked by two borders of interlocked S-forms. A narrow side of the same mafrash was sold by us in 2014. – Small repaired areas, otherwise well preserved.

    Literature:
    TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Shahsavan. Flachgewebe aus dem Iran. Herford 1985, Nr.85 *** GÜGEL, ERNST & WÜHR, RUDOLF, Zweck und Zier. Antike Taschen aus dem Kaukasus und Nordwest-Persien. Traunstein 2010, Abb. S.58 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 84, 31.05.2014, #177

    Published:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 65, 28.05.2005, #73

    • Lot37
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions171 x 126 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800
    • Estimate EUR4,800
    The red field is filled to its full extent by a large, diamond-shaped central medallion with a cruciform interior drawing. Its two gables as well as the inner outlines of the field are decorated with yellow hooks. The wide, dark brown main border contains a geometric, stylised floral vine and large palmettes alternating with diagonal shapes. These rugs from Kirsehir are easily identified by their brilliant and diverse colours in particular combinations and their characteristic medallion. Small-format examples are rare; the design was usually employed in long rugs. The outstanding quality of the colours and drawing suggests considerable age. – Uniformly low pile, a number of repiled areas.

    Literature:
    LEFEVRE, JEAN & PARTNERS, Turkish Rugs from the 16th to the 19th century. London 1977, Nr.19

    • Lot38
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions270 x 142 cm
    • AgeEarly 19th century
    • Estimate EUR12,000
    The field design of very large blue octagons linked along the central axis, each enclosing a cruciform motif decorated with flowers, was created by a synthesis of the old Turkish traditions and the floral Ottoman formal language. The oldest examples of the group are now believed to originate from Karapinar. From there the design spread across Central Anatolia; Ladik appears to have been an initial centre. This gorgeous piece woven in subtle shades was probably made in Mujur. Not only the border design, but also the style of drawing and knotting structure suggest this attribution. – Elaborately restored in places, now in good condition.

    Published:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 43, 18.11.1995, #65 *** CONCARO, EDOARDO & LEVI, ALBERTO, Sovrani Tappeti. Il tappeto orientale dal XV al XIX seculo. Mailand 1999, Nr.36

    • Lot39
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions91 x 57 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,500
    At the centre of the red-brown field, a red box motif with a green hooked outline and arrow-shaped points encloses a yellow rectangle likewise decorated with hooks. Four red triangles with boldly stepped inner sides provide the corner motifs which flank the central medallion. Such traditional four-and-one compositions were widely used throughout Central and East Anatolia for many centuries. – Several repiled areas, otherwise well preserved, including the original flatwoven selvedges.

    Literature:
    MOREHOUSE, BRIAN, Yastiks. Cushion Covers And Storage Bags Of Anatolia. Philadelphia 1996, Nr.51

    • Lot40
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia, Dardanelles region
    • Dimensions92 x 47 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,500
    Judging by its knotting structure, colours and pile wool, this very rare rug sampler previously published by Brüggemann/Böhmer was probably woven in Manyas. It illustrates three different options for the field and border designs of yastiks: at the bottom, two box-shaped medallions with white borders; at the centre, a Memling gül surrounded by rectangles; and at the top, a field design of nested hooked diamonds with an S-border. In Persia, such rug samplers are known as "vagireh". – Very good condition.

    Published:
    BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER & BÖHMER, HARALD, Teppiche der Bauern und Nomaden in Anatolien. Hannover 1980, Nr.84