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Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • The "Pyramid" Rug

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    • Lot91
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions214 x 139 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000

    Ten large pyramids are arranged in two parallel vertical rows in the dark brown field. Their ground colour regularly changes between red and white, and they each contain two nested analogous forms drawn to a smaller scale. Their sides are decorated with long parmakli devices. Small four-legged animals, rosettes, diamonds quartered by colour change and dice composed of five white dots fill the ground of the field. The yellow border, without any secondary borders in this case, contains large S-figures in red, green and blue which have striking, snake-like curled ends. They could be animal symbols. In the vertical bands these designs alternately face inwards or outwards. – This unusual rug was purchased by Heinrich Kirchheim from a Konya dealer and discussed by Ralph Kaffel in a HALI article. At the time, Kaffel was not aware of any other examples with the same design. He assumed that the Pyramid Rug was woven in Central Anatolia. In our opinion, the knotting structure, the type of wool, the fairly muted colours and the powerful style of drawing of the designs using accentuated outlines rather suggest a provenance in East Anatolia. The rug may have been produced by a Kurdish tribal group. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 68.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame.

    Formerly: Cemal Palamutçu, Konya

    Exhibited: Museum Schloß Rheydt, Mönchengladbach, 1995


    Published:
    HALI 82, 1995, ill. p. 111 *** KAFFEL, RALPH, 'Unusually Anatolian. In: Hali, 157, 2008, no. 1, p. 78 *** OS 2, no. 68

    • Lot92
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions476 x 151 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    Increasing in size from bottom to top, three huge octagons with a grassy green, a rich purple and a sand-coloured ground fill the red field of this extraordinarily long Konya rug all the way to the lateral edges. Their vertical distance varies, and the third octagon is spaced so far from the upper horizontal border that it leaves an empty space. Large-scale halved stepped polygons protrude into the areas not covered by the primary designs. The central motif of each octagon is a rectangular box with four arms pointing in the cardinal directions from the sides. Their ends bear a small diamond with double hooks. Four diagonal arms emanate from the corners. This motif is probably zoomorphous and totemic in origin. The upper octagon differs from the other two not only in size and its somewhat irregular shape, but also in terms of its serrated and hooked inner blue outline. Moreover, the box it contains is not placed in the centre. The border design consists of diamonds with double hooks, drawn in an angular kilim style and lined up in a row. This is an eminently monumental carpet of wild and archaic appearance. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 69


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Galerie Sailer, Salzburg


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 69

  • Konya Fragment with Green Star Medallion

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    • Lot93
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions270 x 110 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR6,000 - 8,000

    Most of the field and the upper finish of this impressive red-ground Konya rug have survived. The sides and the lower end are missing. The huge eight-pointed central medallion has a grass-green interior; it contains a red cruciform motif with four palmette-like forms and diagonal yellow lines ending in a small rectangle with an S-symbol. The medallion is surrounded by four outlines: red on the inside, followed by a zigzag band in white and brown, then yellow, and steel-blue on the outside with long double hooks. The four-and-one composition, which is encountered in many Anatolian rugs, is completed by blue corner pieces that each contain a zoomorphous motif and terminate in a long hook extending in the vertical direction, possibly another abstract animal form. Between the unusually narrow border and the upper elem patterned with hyacinths we see a double row of rosettes. Spuhler believed that this area outside the main design was the main border (OS 1, p. 204), but in our opinion this is not the case. The rosettes will have continued all around the central field, possibly not as a double row along the sides. A rug that compares well in composition and ornamentation, but which has a star border, was sold by us in 2010 and attributed to the Aksaray region north east of Konya at the time. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 70. 


    Mounted on fabric

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 76, 4 December 2010, lot 167

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 130 *** OS 2, no. 70

  • Konya Fragment with Star Medallion

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    • Lot94
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions118 x 107 cm
    • Age1650 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR2,000 - 3,000

    In this fragment of an early Konya carpet, the powerful impact of the geometrical design is a remarkable feature. The surviving piece is the lower left corner, with remnants of the border on the left and bottom. A white-ground octagon with an outline of green outer hooks and enclosing an eight-pointed star takes up the whole of the red field. Bizarrely shaped hooked poles, arrow forms and shorter double hooks – all of them red with brown outlines – extend from the points of the star. A red box motif at the centre of the star encloses a small eight-pointed star. The design of the white main border consists of geometrical interlocked figures. The carpet probably had a field design of two octagonal star medallions. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 71


    Mounted on fabric

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Lindenmuseum 1993


    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 97, Zaleski Collection, 30 November 2019, lot 87

    Published:
    HALI 68, 1993, ill. p. 102 *** OS 1, no. 143 *** OS 2, no. 71

  • Konya Rug with Blue Central Medallion

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    • Lot95
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions214 x 139 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR25,000 - 30,000

    A large blue medallion dominates the field of this red-ground Konya rug, which is slightly reduced at both ends but was never much longer. Its stepped two-tone outline veers inwards in eight places to form eight diagonal crosses in blue and yellow. At the centre of the medallion, a red rectangle with serrated outlines encloses a yellow square edged in green. The blue centre of the diamond is filled with four white hook formations arranged in a cruciform shape. Surrounding the medallion are four triangular forms, completing this classic four-and-one composition. Panels at each end contain ivory-ground octagons filled with eight stars that flank a small yellow octagon. The distinctive white octagons resemble those on Large Pattern Holbein rugs. There are elements within the field design that must have had an appeal for weavers over a very wide area, from the Aegean to the Caspian Sea. For instance, the row of double-crosses at one end of the central square, which can be found on the Vakıflar animal rug (inv. no. E 100), in the borders of Shield carpets from Shirvan in the Caucasus and on Tekke Turkmen asmalyks from Turkmenistan. – It is fascinating to compare this colourful example with Caucasian rugs from circa 1750–1850. The vast numbers of the latter that survive suggests that similar compositions and ornaments may well have been made in the Caucasus for centuries. The overall four-and-one design with the four octagons in the corners occurs again, for example, on later Kazak Karachof rugs from the western Caucasus. The border of the Orient Stars rug has an angular meandering stem with flowers alternately pointing inwards and outwards. Very similar patterns can be seen in the ivory-ground borders of many different carpets from the Caucasus. (MF and DM)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 72. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Muammar Kirdök, Vienna

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1. no. 160 *** OS 2, no. 72

  • Bergama with Medallion Repeat

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    • Lot96
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia
    • Dimensions227 x 181 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 7,000

    Huge diamond-shaped medallions take up so much of the field that its red ground is only glimpsed in the narrow diagonal stripes that surround the two green medallions placed on the central axis. The composition is an endless repeat of green medallions and blue medallions offset against them. Only the green medallions with a red octagon at their centres are complete forms. The blue motifs are cut by the borders, appearing as halved forms along the sides and as quarter sections in the corners. All the medallions have a distinctive outline of inward-facing diagonal crosses and long double hooks. In contrast to the very large scale of the field design, the blue main border with small white cruciform flowers in a diagonal lattice of red leaves looks quite delicate. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 73


    Mounted on canvas

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    Galerie Koller, auction of 2 March 1985, lot 1320 *** GANTZHORN, VOLKMAR, Der christlich orientalische Teppich. Cologne 1990, ill. 494, p. 360 *** OS 1, no. 162 *** OS 2, no. 73

  • White-Ground Niche Carpet

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    • Lot97
    • OriginSouthern Central Anatolia, Toros Mountains
    • Dimensions157 x 107 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    No image can reveal how a rug feels when one touches it. One of the great sensual attractions of plate 74 is the softness of the wool, which is obviously lost without physical contact. In this instance, I must convey a personal interest, having purchased the rug many years ago, drawn by its especially beautiful wool and colours. I had seen illustrations of other examples that were probably from the same tribe, and I also felt that the style of drawing of the tulips and the rosettes could possibly relate it to other rugs attributed to the 17th and 18th centuries. – Eight comparative examples are usually cited, although I believe only two to be directly related, the Mirzakhanian and the Halevim. These two and the Orient Stars rug all have a pattern of two niches, one inside the other, formed by ascending lines that have protruding hooks on both sides of the uprights but only on the outer edge of the diagonals. The niches terminate in a finial at the upper end. I believe that the Orient Stars example might be the oldest of the three. Its simple but colourful border, the green selvedge and kilim, the well-drawn and colourful rosettes and tulip ornaments all combine to give it its splendour. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 74. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: The Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 184 *** OS 2, no. 74

  • Fragment of a Daghestan Flatweave

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    • Lot98
    • OriginNorth East Caucasus, Daghestan
    • Dimensions138 x 270 cm
    • Age1750 - 1850
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000

    This fragment is from a very large double-faced flatwoven carpet. Both end have been reduced, but the lateral borders have completely survived. The width is thus known whereas the length remains a matter of speculation. The red ground is densely covered in blue designs. Arranged in a grid shape, they surround a set of large nested octagons with a central eight-pointed star. The remains of a stripe with yellow motifs survives at each end of the field. In the brown border, hexagonal cartouches resembling open frames are linked by a pole. The colours appear in reverse order on the back: the ground is blue, the drawing is red, and the border has brown motifs on a beige ground (see ill. in Jourdan).  – The age and provenance of this very rare fragment was a mystery for a long time. On account of its design Friedrich Spuhler, the previous owner, believed it to be a 17th century Egyptian weaving with motifs that had survived from the Mamluk period. It is now certain that the rug was made in Daghestan during the 18th/19th century. Robert Chenciner who travelled the mountainous regions of the North East Caucasus discovered a fragment of the same group in the remote mountain village of Mishlesh and saw a complete large carpet when visiting the local mosque. In addition there is a photo taken in 1912 of a carpet workshop in Tbilisi. It shows a double-faced flatwoven carpet of the same type hanging on the back wall of the room. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 75.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin


    Published:
    JOURDAN, UWE, Orientteppiche. Augsburg 1997, no. 182, p. 203 *** OS 2, no. 75