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Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • The Arhan Palmette Rug

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    • Lot11
    • OriginSouth Caucasus, Karabagh
    • Dimensions335 x 104 cm
    • Age1675 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR10,000 - 15,000

    This long runner is named Arhan carpet after one its previous owners, the Istanbul dealer Yahya Arhan. The narrow white field shows an ascending design composed of three large motifs that are all identical in drawing: a tree with a short trunk and two huge wing-like leaves branching off diagonally from the bottom, crowned with an angular palmette drawn in a geometrical style. The free spaces contain smaller palmettes, blossoms and rosettes, and two abstract blue birds are seen at the lower end. – A total of eight rugs with this distinctive design are known. Three of them used to belong to Arhan: aside from the piece purchased by Kirchheim, there is a second rug now owned by the Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, and a fragment now in a London private collection. Three of the five other palmette rugs are now in the Austrian MAK Museum, Vienna, the Ali Pasha Mosque, Tokat and the Islamic Museum of Doha, Qatar. Two others whose whereabouts are unknown were sold by Sotheby's, London, in 1983 and by Christie's, New York, in 1991. The Vienna example has a border similar to the Kirchheim rug. The other pieces have different borders. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 1, p. 92


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Yahya Arhan, Istanbul

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Literature:
    ESKENAZI, JOHNNY (ed.), Il tappeto orientale dal XV al XVIII seculo. London 1981, pl. 20

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 61

  • Karabagh with Proto-Alpan Design

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    • Lot12
    • OriginSouth Caucasus, Karabagh
    • Dimensions424 x 182 cm
    • Age1675 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR25,000 - 30,000

    A gorgeous Karabagh woven in the kelleh format. On the one hand, its complex infinite repeat of palmettes in varying shapes, sizes and colours, V-shaped yellow bars, blue sickle leaves, cartouches and a wealth of other motifs seems to echo the tradition of Caucasian dragon rugs, but on the other hand it may be an early form of a so-called Alpan design carpet. Moreover, there is a strong resemblance to specific Azerbaijani silk embroideries from the 18th century. The large palmettes placed on the midline constitute the symmetrical axis of the composition, which is mirrored on either side, and also provide structure in the jumble of ornaments arranged diagonally and horizontally around them. The only directly comparable example is the yellow-ground Gibson carpet in Colonial Williamsburg. (DM)

    Discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 1, pp. 103-105


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Galerie Bausback, Mannheim

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Literature:
    LANIER, MILDRED B., English and Oriental Carpets at Williamsburg. Williamsburg 1975, no. 48

    Published:
    LEFEVRE, JEAN & PARTNERS, Caucasian Carpets. London 1977, no. 2 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike Orientteppiche. Brunswick 1978, pl. p. 151 *** OS 1, no. 67

  • Red-Ground Carpet with Palmette Design

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    • Lot13
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Azerbaijan
    • Dimensions327 x 201 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR20,000 - 25,000

    Woven in particularly splendid colours, this rug was probably made in a small workshop in Persian Azerbaijan. A repeat of palmettes in varying shapes and sizes adorns its red field. The largest palmettes are arranged in horizontal rows of four motifs, and in between the smaller palmettes are offset against them. The small transverse cartouches, likewise aligned in horizontal rows, are a striking and rare feature. The design and its ornaments are derived from Esfahan models and have been translated into the geometrical style of North West Persia. The North West Persian-Caucasian style of drawing is particularly evident in the dark blue main border. (DM)

    Discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 1, p. 112


    Mounted on canvas

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 75

  • Balikesir Kilim Fragment

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    • Lot14
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia
    • Dimensions82 x 55 cm
    • Age18th century or earlier
    • Estimate EUR600 - 800

    Alternately red- and beige-ground forms resembling arrowheads, tapering off into triangles at the top and indented at the bottom, are divided in two halves by a delicate central blue line. They are combined into horizontal rows in the field of this small kilim fragment. The regular changes in colour produce diagonal relationships within the tile-like design. A remnant of a plain light blue border survives on the left. The archaic simplicity of the composition and distinct patina of the colours indicate an early date. According to Rageth (OS 1, p. 160), no directly comparable example is known. He surmised that the kilim from which this fragment derives could have measured around 200 x 140 cm, because this would correspond to the dimensions of sofrehs from the Balikesir region. (DM)


    Mounted on canvas.

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    HALI 68, 1993, ill. p. 100 *** OS 1, no. 86

    • Lot15
    • OriginEastern Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions400 x 140 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000

    This large kilim woven in a single panel probably originates from a village in the Aksaray region. This attribution is suggested particularly by the colours, with a high proportion of aubergine, ochre and light green, as well as the way in which they are combined. The white field is divided into three rectangular compartments by two wide horizontal bars which are patterned in geometrically stylised abstract animals. Each compartment has a large cruciform medallion with parmakli outlines on its central axis. An indented blazing red form with parmakli outlines protrudes towards the centre from each side. Viewed as a whole, the impression created is that of a double niche design. The same abstract animals as those in the dividing bands are lined up along the upper and lower ends of the three sections of the field. The kilim once terminated in wide elems with two different design stripes. Only the inner stripe of the elem survives at one end, so originally the kilim would have been somewhat longer. (DM)

    Description by Jürg Rageth in OS 1, no. 93, pp. 166 f


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Jürg Rageth, Riehen

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Literature:
    COOTNER, CATHRYN & MUSE, GARRY, Anatolian Kilims. The Caroline & H. McCoy Jones Collection. San Francisco-London 1990, pl. 6

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 93

  • Niğde Kilim with Elibelinde Design

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    • Lot16
    • OriginEastern Central Anatolia, Cappadocia
    • Dimensions305 x 170 cm
    • Age18th century or earlier
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 6,000

    In the white field of this single-panel Cappadocian kilim, large and immaculately drawn elibelinde motifs form an infinite repeat of offset horizontal rows. They consist of two halves mirrored on the horizontal central axis and joined to form an elongated lozenge with two vertical points. The sharp-edged and closely spaced motifs are interlocked so as to produce a complex overall picture full of tension and dynamic energy. The colour of the motifs changes from one row to the next. The elibelindes are woven in two colours (light red and light orange) in just one of the lower rows. All the other motifs are a monochrome light green, light red, azure, aubergine or dark brown. A narrow aubergine border of reciprocal hook forms decorated with small brocaded symbols effectively frames the field at the long sides. The wide three-band elems display varying designs. In the central band of the lower elem, we see large elibelinde motifs of a different type and of archaic appearance. Still open to a figural interpretation, they are an early form of this ancient design that was once widespread throughout Anatolia, and to which a ritual symbolism is attributed. The central white band of the elem on the opposite end has abstract birds lined up in a row. – Very finely woven in colours of outstanding quality, this kilim dating from the pre-1800 period is one of the best surviving examples of its kind. The illustration in the catalogue of the 1990 Basel exhibition still shows the kilim in the state it was discovered. It was mounted on canvas prior to the exhibition of the Kirchheim Collection in Hamburg in 1993. (DM)


    Formerly: Jürg Rageth, Riehen

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Literature:
    BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, pl. 24

    Published:
    RAGETH, JÜRG (ed.), Frühe Formen & Farben. Gewebe aus Anatolien. Die Ausstellung. Riehen 1990, pl. 14 *** OS 1, no. 99

  • Zili Wrapping Cloth

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    • Lot17
    • OriginSouthern Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions85 x 62 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,200 - 1,600

    In this small red-ground zili flatweave, a Central Anatolian Yürük weaving, the striking visual effect of the strictly geometrical design brocaded in harmonious colours is remarkable. Surrounded by an inconspicuous narrow border, the field contains pointed gables which are aligned side by side and one above the another so that the design can be read either as a sequence of horizontal zig-zag bands or as vertical rows of interlocked triangular gables. Both directions of the composition are emphasised by thin outlines in red and white. Muska symbols adorn the elems. (DM)


    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Literature:
    BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, pl. 136 *** BÖHMER, HARALD, Nomaden in Anatolien. Ganderkesee 2004, two ills. p. 270

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 109

  • Konya Rug with Stars

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    • Lot18
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions206 x 88 cm
    • Age18th/19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,500 - 2,000

    Woven in a long and narrow format, this village rug was probably produced in the eastern part of the Konya region. This is indicated by the colours. In the dark brown field, star-filled octagons are arranged in horizontal rows of four motifs each to form a repeat. The same designs adorn the ochre border which is not accompanied by secondary borders. The motif of the eight-pointed star inscribed in an octagon appears to be very old. It remained virtually unchanged over the course of many centuries and is found in the rugs of various cultures, so effectively it was a universal design. (DM)


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 150 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 52 "Orient Stars", 2 October 1999, lot 63

  • Konya Fragment with Stylised Animal Figures

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    • Lot19
    • OriginEastern Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions79 x 81 cm
    • Age1750 - 1850
    • Estimate EUR1,500 - 2,000

    This small fragment is part of the upper right corner of a rare red-ground carpet that was attributed to the eastern Konya region by Spuhler in OS 1 (no. 174, p. 252). Flat or slanting S-forms arranged in horizontal rows combine into an infinite repeat in the field. Spuhler called these motifs “graphic magical hooks”, but does not go into their interpretation. We believe that the hooks may be highly abstract animal figures. The effect of the design on a larger surface can be seen in the completely preserved carpet illustrated in OS 1, number 175, although its origin is the Çal region in south western rather than central Anatolia. (DM)


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 174

  • Fragment with Grid Design

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    • Lot20
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions196 x 110 cm
    • Age16th/17th century
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000

    This very rare carpet which cannot be attributed to any of the known groups was positioned horizontally in the illustration published in OS 1. We have decided to illustrate the rug in the direction of the pile, i.e. with the pile pointing downwards. This allows us to clearly define the upper and lower ends of the carpet. The original dimensions of this very rare carpet remain a matter of speculation. The carpet was probably not much wider, but considerably longer. The two rows of facing salmon-pink double hooks at the lower end of the fragment may have served as dividing motifs that marked the centre of a mirror-image field design composed of several sections. All the cobalt blue motifs seen in the area above them are identical in drawing and vary only slightly in size. They offer little contrast to the aubergine ground, creating a mystical atmosphere. They stand out far more boldly in the salmon-pink horizontal stripe at the top. The weave, the wool and the dark palette suggest a provenance in East Anatolia. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by Garry Muse in OS 1, no. 217


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 217