Sprachauswahl
Language

Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • Star Medallion Rug Fragment

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot41
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions152 x 113 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 40,000

    The surviving section is the lower left corner of a large yellow-ground carpet with an aubergine-ground star medallion and quarter sections of a similar medallion in the corners. The strictly symmetrical composition allows us to determine the original size of the carpet: it would have been around 2.8 metres long and 1.7 metres wide. (DM) - As Muse pointed out in 1993, the full pattern of this rug can be reconstructed from what remains: a central eight-pointed star medallion with similar quarter-medallions in the corners, set on a yellow background, with the stars outlined in red and black. Although some might see this as a centralised design because of the wide plain band of background that surrounds the corner motifs, I believe that the quarter-medallions in the corners were intended to create the impression of an endless repeat. This fragment is very different in weave and colours to carpets from Uşak, and it is possible that it was made somewhere to the north of Konya. The way the primary and minor borders are drawn is consistent with rugs made in around 1500. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 18. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 205 *** OS 2, no. 18

  • Star Medallion Rug Fragment

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot42
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions138 x 102 cm
    • Age1400 - 1500
    • Estimate EUR12,000 - 15,000

    On this Orient Stars rug the field design is composed of an eight-lobed star medallion in the centre that is repeated in quarters in each corner. Here, though, beyond the corner pieces is an extra panel, the design of which is taken directly from a four-lobed Uşak carpet. – Sixteen four-lobed main carpets survive and these were all probably made circa 1450-1550. Thirteen are from the Uşak region and three from central Anatolia; just five are complete and eleven are fragmented to some degree. The earliest examples of the four-lobed Uşak carpets, such as the Haim carpet in Milan, have border patterns that belong firmly within the tribal rug repertoire. – While the overall composition seen on this Orient Stars fragment of an eight-pointed star medallion in the centre and quarter-medallions in the corners is similar to that on classical Star Uşaks, the motifs within the medallions are very different, with archaic animal forms rather than the floral patterns of the latter. – The endless knots placed in the field around the central medallion are drawn in a manner not seen on other Anatolian rugs. Originally there would have been twelve, but only three survive. The rug does not have an inner minor border, and the pattern of the wide primary border is unique. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 19. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson, and The Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 206 *** OS 2, no. 19

  • Compartment Carpet Fragment

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot43
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions92 x 72 cm
    • Age1400 - 1500
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    The basic composition in the field of this very old fragment can be interpreted as a grid of square-shaped compartments, with a rosette within an eight-pointed star at the centre of each. Extending from the star on the four main axes are four large leaf-like forms in blue set against a dark brown background. In each of the four corners of the square compartment are floral motifs that could well be derived from animal forms. Alternatively, the pattern can be read as columns and rows of diamond-shaped forms that are internally divided both vertically and horizontally, with their designs mirroring diagonally. As far as we know, no other Anatolian tribal rug with this pattern has been found. (MF).

    Extract from OS 2, no. 20. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 203 *** OS 2, no. 20

  • Red Double Niche Carpet

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot44
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions164 x 124 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000

    This very rare double niche carpet dating from the first half of the 16th century is almost completely preserved. It exudes an atmosphere of tranquillity and harmony. This is due to the coherent composition which is conceived both vertically and horizontally in mirror image. Two light blue bridge-shaped prayer arches patterned in small colourful rosettes face each other at the ends of the russet field. Their sides are linked by a band identical in colour and design that surrounds the whole of the field, not touching its inner sides anywhere so it appears to float. This frame only opens to give space to the tops of the arches. A lamp is hanging from the apex of each arch. – Alternatively, the composition can be read as a wide shield motif with a rectangular centre. An octagon with yellow hooked outlines is surrounded by stars at its midpoint, flanked in the corners by four triangular ornaments reminiscent of abstract animals. The four corner sections outside the shield, or alternatively, next to the sides of the arch each contain a palmette surrounded by small octagons. The design of the narrow white-ground main border, a red ornamental band of closely packed small diamonds and colourful diagonal crosses, is not encountered in any other Anatolian rug. The deep purple seen here in some of the ornaments and the ground colour of the elems is only found in this quality in very old carpets. Certain 19th century Caucasian rugs are surprisingly similar in composition, reiterating the as yet unresolved question of the links that may have existed between the west and east. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 21


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson, and Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 200 *** OS 2, no. 21

  • Two Fragments of a Red Central Medallion Carpet

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot45
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • DimensionsA = 131 x 76, B = 78 x 81
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    Fortunately, just enough of these two fragments survives to not only reconstruct much of the composition of the carpet, but also to determine its original size of approximately 205 by 335 cm. The section from the left side is informative because it retains the outermost edge of the top left corner piece of the field as well as half of the central medallion, and the square section from the lower right corner of the field helps to reconstruct the central medallion. It has generally been assumed that the form of quatrefoil medallion on the famous Benguiat carpet in the Ballard Collection derived from Mongol cloud collars was unique among Anatolian carpets. In fact, although its internal detail is not found elsewhere, the general composition of lobes sitting on the vertical and horizontal axes can also be seen on the Bausback Three-Medallion Uşak .The Kirchheim carpet can now be added to the short list of comparisons, because sufficient of the pattern of the central medallion survives to strongly suggest that this also had a very similar form. Careful examination of the corner quarter-medallion on the smaller fragment and extrapolation of it to create a full medallion reveals a very similar quatrefoil shape. The meander primary border is often seen on late 15th- and early 16th-century carpets from western Anatolia in combination with several different field designs. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 22. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Gary Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993; Metropolitan Museum, New York 1993 - 2012 (on loan)


    Published:
    OS 1, nos. 208, 209 *** OS 2, no. 22

  • Medallion Carpet Fragment

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot46
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions96 x 97 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR12,000 - 15,000

    We cannot be sure whether this surviving section represents approximately half of the original rug or whether it was longer. If, however, a reconstruction was created based on the assumption that approximately half survives, then the central medallion, placed within a large aubergine-coloured hexagonal inner or upper field, would have been formed by four geometric forms delineated in yellow. This central medallion has a corner piece in blue outlined in yellow on each of the diagonals, mirrored above and below. At the top and bottom ends of the medallion is an ornament akin to the Arabesque design. In 1993 (OS 1, page 329), Muse suggested that it may have been a prototype for the latter. However, I am more inclined to consider that it is a derivative. The motif here is extremely similar to that used on the refined, classical Arabesque rugs that were created possibly in the last quarter of the 15th century.

    Surrounding the aubergine hexagonal field is a larger, outer or lower field with a blue background, also hexagonal and with red flowers and leaves on the sides and possibly abstracted creatures at the ends. Other Anatolian rugs have similar patterning, but this example may well be the best drawn and probably is the oldest. The four corners of the field have patterns that lie somewhere between floral motifs and abstracted creatures against a green ground. The inner and outer minor borders have a continuous zigzag design that can be seen on many other rugs from western Anatolia dating from the late 15th century onwards. The primary border of a meandering floral stem appears on a number of west Anatolian carpets with a wide variety of field patterns. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 23. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Gary Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    HALI 68, 1993, ill. p. 98 *** OS 1, no. 207 *** OS 2, no. 23

  • Fragment of a Red-Ground Three-Gül Rug

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot47
    • OriginCentral or East Anatolia
    • Dimensions142 x 94 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR25,000 - 30,000

    The pattern of this rug is composed of three different güls, two in the field and one in the border. One of the former is among the most commonly found ornaments on Anatolian rugs: the stepped and hooked gül in an octagon. In the carpet world this is called the ‘Memling gül’ after the 15th-century artist Hans Memling (ca. 1433 – 1494) who depicted a table covered in a carpet patterned with this gül. The second gül on this rug, shaped like a diamond with hooks on the edges, often composed of small compartments but filled with a variety of interiors is named after the Florentine painter Domenico Ghirlandaio (1448 – 1498), because rugs with this gül appear in his paintings. The third gül on this rug which appears only in the border here, was used on Anatolian carpets both in a repeating grid across the field and in borders. As a reciprocal design it can be viewed in two ways within its rectangle: either as a vertical cross with hooked ends which has a diamond centre and is set within an implied octagon; or as four anchor-like motifs pointing inwards from the corners. - This fragment is from a most intriguing rug and upon close inspection it presents more questions than answers. I have made attempts to re-create the complete composition, but the parts that survive do not make that possible with any certainty. It is very difficult to propose a region in Anatolia where this was rug made. It has an unusually strong depth and saturation of colour. It cannot be related easily to any other rugs from this period, nor to the well-known types from Bergama, Uşak, Ladik, Konya or Karapinar. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 24. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Gary Muse, Tucson, and The Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993; Metropolitan Museum, New York 1994 - 2012 (on loan)


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 187 *** OS 2, no. 24

  • Yellow-Ground Konya with Memling Güls

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot48
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions228 x 126 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR1,500 - 2,000

    The Memling gül clearly had a great longevity. Judging from its appearance in European paintings and on some surviving examples, it was certainly fully formed by the middle of the 15th century and may well have been much older. It was undoubtedly used on rugs made in many different parts of Anatolia. It is most likely to have been a Turkmen gül. – Soon after the publication of "Orient Stars", Heinrich and Waltraut decided to sell most of the examples of this group. They chose to concentrate their resources on acquiring earlier carpets. They did keep this particular rug, which has some beautiful colours, the yellow background being exceptionally attractive. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 25. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 97, Zaleski Collection, 30 November 2019, lot 118

    Published:
    Spuhler, Friedrich, Zeitlose Tradition, Die gelbgrundigen Teppiche aus Konya. In: Weltkunst, vol. 57, no. 22. Munich 1987, pp. 3424 ff., ill. 2 *** OS 1, no. 110 *** OS 2, no. 25

  • Yellow-Ground Star Medallion Carpet

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot49
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions279 x 118 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR170,000 - 200,000

    The central field of this magnificent carpet is composed of a pattern that is almost exactly mirrored both horizontally and vertically. In each of the four corners of the field is a quarter-medallion and when these are combined they create a medallion similar to the one in the centre. The eight-pointed star in the central medallion survives but much of the area around it is lost. However, by close examination of what remains in the corners one can begin to reconstruct most of the missing parts. –The general composition of the primary border, with alternating inward- and outward-pointing flowers flanked by split leaves, features on carpets from many regions, but none have been found that are exactly the same as here. The diagonal ornament with an octagon in the centre is particularly unusual. – The freshness and brilliance of the colours, the saturated reds and blues contrasting with the brilliant yellow background, combined with the elegance of the drawing of the central medallion and the balance of composition all give this carpet its particular appeal. There are remarkably few Anatolian carpets surviving in this large size compared with smaller rugs. The latter may have survived in greater numbers because some were hung vertically as door rugs for tent entrances. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 26. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993; Metropolitan Museum New York, 1994-2012 (on loan)


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 196 *** OS 2, no. 26

  • Fragment with Star Medallion and Palmette Border

    Place bidAdd to wishlist
    • Lot50
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Bergama region
    • Dimensions95 x 173 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR8,000 - 10,000

    The surviving section is the upper part of a carpet whose original dimensions remain a matter of speculation. A dark brown rectangular compartment surrounded by a yellow frame floats freely on a blue field densely patterned in small blossoms. It contains a red eight-pointed star enclosing yellow and blue hook forms of zoomorphous appearance arranged around a central box motif. In the wide brown-ground main border we see ragged palmettes pointing inwards or outwards in an alternating rhythm and linked by a geometrical vine. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 27.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Exhibited: Museum Schloß Rheydt, Mönchengladbach, 1995


    Published:
    HALI 82, 1995, ill. p. 110 *** OS 2, no. 27