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Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • Rug with Zoomorphous Central Medallion

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    • Lot61
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Ladik
    • Dimensions301 x 166 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR80,000 - 100,000

    A very large octagonal central medallion with a brown ground floats freely in the blazing red field which terminates in an arch with a jagged outline at each end. What might seem a little unusual on this carpet is that the central medallion has a small yellow medallion rather than a pendant at each end, almost identical examples to which can be seen on numerous small 16th-century rugs from Uşak (see example in the Islamic Museum, Berlin). Also typical of several small Uşak rugs are the quatrefoil quarter-medallions in each corner. – The most remarkable element of this Orient Stars carpet is the central medallion, which depicts many of the fascinating abstracted creatures that we seek in the best tribal rugs of Anatolia. What we are looking at here is a Turkmen gül design. The pattern is mirrored both vertically and horizontally. The yellow and red ‘creatures’ each in a rectangular box in the very centre of this carpet were probably derived from abstracted mythological birds. – Of the four other examples that share this patterning within the medallion, three have pendants and lobed quarter-medallion corner pieces. All of the four have different patterns in both the major and minor borders. The border of the [Orient Stars carpet] resembles Uşak cloudband borders but the style of the drawing and the motifs between the cloudbands are more zoomorphic in character. None of these rugs are sufficiently closely related to one another to suggest that they might have been made by the same sub-tribe. However, it is possible that they may all have been made in the same general region in central Anatolia, probably not too far from Ladik. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 38. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Galerie Sailer, Salzburg

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Literature:
    SPUHLER, FRIEDRICH, Die Orientteppiche im Museum für Islamische Kunst Berlin. Munich 1987, no. 23

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 201 *** HALI 68, 1993, ill. p. 101 ***

  • Medallion Carpet Fragment

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    • Lot62
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Ushak
    • Dimensions112 x 183 cm
    • Age1450 - 1525
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000

    If this surviving fragment represents half of the rug, one could then easily imagine the other half as a mirror image of it. However, if this were the case then the rug would have measured approximately 185 by 195 cm, almost square, which is not unknown but certainly unusual. The relatively wide border and narrow field might well suggest that this could be one end of a long runner with several – perhaps three – medallions. The size would then have been about 185 by 470 cm. – As Muse pointed out in 1993, while this fragment has very beautiful colours, the most impressive feature is the border pattern with confronting abstracted creatures. It can be related to the curled leaf border that was used on a relatively small number of Tekke Turkmen main carpets, on some Tekke asmalyks, on Yomut Turkmen main carpets from Turkmenistan and on Shield carpets from the Shirvan region of the eastern Caucasus. - Although Muse’s dating of this fragment to the 15th century is perfectly possible and within the limits of the scientific test, I would not be so bold, bearing in mind the style of drawing within the medallion and the Uşak-style minor border, and would place it into the late 15th or early 16th century. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 39. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 204 *** OS 2, no. 39

  • Green-Ground Double Niche Rug Fragment

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    • Lot63
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions148 x 152 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR12,000 - 15,000

    A little over half of this beautiful rug survives, which is enough to envisage it complete. It has design elements of Uşak carpets, although the weave and colours are not similar to others from that locality. – The most striking aspect of this rug, apart from its glorious colours, is that the field is peppered with tiny red dots or balls. Random spots on rugs are thought to resemble the markings of leopards, and the rugs themselves to represent woollen versions of animal pelts used for warmth. It is, therefore, hardly surprising to find animal designs on Anatolian rugs from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. The dots in the field of this Orient Stars rug are in red and the background is a turquoise that changes to a glorious green at the upper end. The composition of a cusped medallion in the centre divided into four compartments each containing a single flower combined with quartered medallions in the corners of the field is typical of a number of small Double Niche Uşak rugs. The first depiction of one of the latter is in Girolamo da Santacroce’s The Calling of Saint Matthew, dated 1519, in the Museo Civico, Bassano, and it is more than likely that similar rugs were made in the last quarter of the 15th century and continued to be woven for at least a hundred years. The knot and rotating motifs pattern in the primary border which was also used as a field design (cf. Alexander) is discussed in more detail in the essay ‘The Knot and Rotating Motifs Pattern’ earlier in this book. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 40. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame


    Literature:
    ALEXANDER, CHRISTOPHER, A Foreshadowing of 21st Century Art. The Color and Geometry of Very Early Turkish Carpets. Berkeley 1993, pl. p. 249

    Published:
    OS 2, no. 40

  • Two Fragments of a Star Medallion Carpet

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    • Lot64
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • DimensionsA = 72 x 72, B = 87 x 40 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000

    It is possible that these two fragments are the work of Kurdish weavers in eastern Anatolia.

    Since no comparative examples with established dates are available, it is impossible to assign them to any particular group. The results of radiocarbon testing suggest it was made at an early date. We have no idea how large the original carpet was, nor can we place these two small sections in relation to each other with any accuracy. On the larger section, the perimeter of what is probably an eight-pointed star medallion is outlined with two bands of double-hooks that each point outwards. The interior drawing of the medallion consists of interlocked and reciprocal, seemingly zoomorphous forms in yellow, blue and green arranged in mirror symmetry. The star motif is embedded in a dark brown box. Since the smaller fragment has a red ground, it seems reasonable to assume that the design of the carpet consisted of several sections with changing ground colours and ornaments. (MF and DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 41.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame.

    Formerly: Krikor Markarian, New York


    Published:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 54, 20 May 2000, lot 47 *** OS 2, no. 41

  • Green-Ground Medallion Carpet

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    • Lot65
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions231 x 167 cm
    • Age1450 - 1500
    • Estimate EUR60,000 - 80,000

    In the deep green field, a dark blue, oval central medallion with a yellow outline encloses a red medallion with a star in the middle, surrounded by what appears like an aureole of stems and flowers. Long yellow and red angular stems bearing palmettes, arabesques and many different flowers fill the field in a composition symmetrically centred on the vertical axis. In the red border, jagged palmettes are linked by a wide blue vine. The large scale of its ornaments is a striking feature. In his comprehensive discussion, Michael Franses draws the conclusion that this rug woven in a Persian style and design may be the product of an Armenian workshop in East Anatolia. Its complex design is derived from Tabriz models. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 42


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Italian private collection; John Eskenazi, Milan


    Published:
    FINARTE Milan, auction of 31 March 1993, lot 154 **** HALI 63, 1992, ill. p. 141 *** OS 2, no. 42

  • The Uhlemann Animal Tree Carpet

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    • Lot66
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Ladik
    • Dimensions323 x 132 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR40,000 - 50,000

    This very rare Ladik from an old Dresden collection was purchased by Heinrich Kirchheim at our November 1994 sale. Consigned after the deadline for the catalogue, the rug was offered as a “late entry” and is thus not illustrated in the catalogue. – A mighty straight-lined tree with blue and yellow abstract birds attached to the sides of its trunk rises on the central axis along the whole length of the dark red field. It is flanked by sixteen tower-like ornaments arranged in two vertical rows that are identical in colour and drawing in the horizontal direction, so they form pairs. The field is surrounded by a continuous blue line decorated with birds on its inner side. The design of the white main border consists of very beautifully drawn eight-pointed stars, each in two diagonally opposed colours. The secondary borders of small squares connected by a thin line like beads on a string not only frame the main border, but also form a three-band finishing stripe at both ends of the rug. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 43


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Friedrich Uhlemann, Dresden

    Exhibited: Museum Schloß Rheydt, Mönchengladbach, 1995


    Published:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 41, 12 November 1994, lot 38 A *** OS 2, no. 43

  • Green-Ground Chintamani Carpet

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    • Lot67
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Karapinar
    • Dimensions337 x 128 cm
    • Age1550 - 1600
    • Estimate EUR90,000 - 110,000

    The field of this extremely beautiful carpet is composed of a repeating design of offset rows of chintamani motifs. The chintamani is composed of three balls and wavy lines or ‘lips’, the former adopted as a Buddhist symbol in India, the latter probably derived from tiger stripes, and the two combined by the Ottomans in the 15th century. It became exceedingly popular and can be seen in its finest rendering on the earliest silk-piled velvets from Bursa. The chintamani pattern was taken up by the carpet makers of Selendi in the Uşak region of western Anatolia, where it was used against ivory backgrounds, often less well drawn. Its popularity did not stop there, and it was used by weavers in various parts of Anatolia, in particular in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. – The example presented here is from the Karapinar group from central Anatolia. Two other green-field carpets survive which are so similar to the Orient Stars Chintamani carpet that they must have come from the same locality: one in the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts (Inv. no. 874) and the other in a private collection. The remarkable similarity of these three shows that they were part of a traditional art form. We cannot be certain that these three were all made at the same time. All three have a distinct abrash, which occurs when the weaver ran out of a particular colour and had to re-dye additional batches that sometimes turned out a slightly different colour. The Orient Stars example is undoubtedly the most beautiful and has a border pattern rarely found on other Anatolian carpets. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 44. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Galerie Sailer, Salzburg


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 44

  • Star Medallion Rug Fragment

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    • Lot68
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions95 x 177 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR5,000 - 7,000

    The superb colours and eye-catching ornaments of this red-ground carpet are enchanting features. The lower third, with the borders all around, and the elem have survived. We can assume with certainty that the design was conceived in mirror image. The composition centred on an eight-lobed star medallion of which only the very bottom now remains. It was surrounded by four smaller halved medallions offset against it along the sides which differ from the central motif in shape and interior design. Two further motifs, effectively scaled-down versions of the secondary medallions, were attached to the central medallion on the central axis. The design of the yellow main border – halved serrated diamonds in an alternating rhythm and diagonal leaves – is very rare. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 45


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson, and The Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, No. 193 *** OS 2, no. 45

  • Star Medallion Carpet

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    • Lot69
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions211 x 130 cm
    • Age1650 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000

    At the midpoint of the dark brown field, there is a blue eight-pointed star medallion with a central red octagon drawn in the style of Holbein carpets and surrounded by eight smaller ornaments. Decorated with a prickly white vine, the wide red outline of the star appears like a protective wall to ward off the chaos that prevails outside in the field . Here, the large secondary motifs – box-like güls with a cruciform interior drawing – are arranged in three vertical rows as in Turkmen rugs, with the middle row passing beneath the central medallion. A wealth of smaller ornaments covers the ground almost completely. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 46


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson, and The Textile Gallery, London

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 194 *** OS 2, no. 46

  • Fragment of a Yellow Konya Rug

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    • Lot70
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions99 x 67 cm
    • Age1600 - 1650
    • Estimate EUR7,000 - 9,000

    As far as I know, this is the only surviving rug with this particular field design of stems, leaves and flowers. The pattern was most likely mirrored through the centre both vertically and horizontally. Assuming that just under half the original length of the rug survives, then it would have had a unique skeleton-like star medallion, depicted only in outline, with the yellow of the field visible through it. A large red palmette extends from the end of the medallion. – As Muse pointed out in 1993 (OS 1, no. 212, p. 334), the design used for the border is found on many hundreds of 19th-century Caucasian rugs. Muse mentioned it appearing on only two early Anatolian rugs, but that number can now be increased. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 47. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Garry Muse, Tucson

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 212 *** OS 2, no. 47