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Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • Cloudband Border Fragment

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    • Lot71
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions127 x 59 cm
    • Age1500 - 1550
    • Estimate EUR2,500 - 3,000

    This fragment of a main border shows a design of very large angular cloudbands on a heavily corroded brown ground. Arranged in an in-and-out rhythm, the powerful designs have yellow outlines and enclose blue forms. Small white and yellow flowers linked by diagonal stems adorn the spaces along the sides. Seeing that the main border was almost 60 centimetres wide, the carpet it once belonged to must have been very large in size. Michael Franses believes that the carpet may be one of the fragmented examples discovered by Belkis Balpinar in the Great Mosque of Divrigi in 1978. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 48


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Franz Sailer, Salzburg


    Published:
    HALI 82, p. 111 *** OS 2, no. 48

  • Two Yellow-Ground Konya Fragments

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    • Lot72
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • DimensionsA = 103 x 62, B = 54 x 45
    • Agecirca 1400 – 1500
    • Estimate EUR500 - 600

    It is generally believed that the vast majority of the large ‘yellow ground Konya’ group of rugs that have this particular combination of weave, selvedge, colours and wool – and mostly have a yellow background – were made circa 1700–1800. Their patterns are quite strong, but the interpretation is relatively crude. They were ignored by most collectors until Spuhler started to acquire them in Turkey and formed a collection that he sold to the Kirchheims. – The two fragments are the upper right corner and a section from the left side of a rug of unknown size. An almost identical section was with Jim Dixon in California. One early Anatolian rug is known with a composition of octagons in diagonal rows, the ivory ground Alaaddin Mosque carpet with Turkmen güls in the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts which was possibly made circa 1200–1300. It is quite probable that certain types of rugs were made in exactly the same form for three, four or even five hundred years. If the tribe that made them was fairly isolated and the tradition remained strong, then the patterns were a language that evolved very slowly if at all. Spuhler believed many members of this group to be considerably older than the dates others had previously assigned to them, and judging by the carbon-14 test results for this example (14C 1408–1625) he could well be correct. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 49. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    Spuhler, Friedrich, Zeitlose Tradition, Die gelbgrundigen Teppiche aus Konya. In: Weltkunst, vol. 57, no. 22. Munich 1987, pp. 3424 ff., ill. 1 *** OS 1, no. 112 *** OS 2, no. 49

  • Carpet with Wheel Medallion and Animal Border

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    • Lot73
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions159 x 125 cm
    • Age1550 - 1600
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 40,000

    At the centre of the field, which changes from a grassy green at the bottom to a turquoise green at the top, a red eight-spoked wheel medallion contains a red octagon that is surrounded by eight stars and leaves radiating outwards. Edged in a brilliant white outline, the medallion stands out boldly from the ground. It has two long hooks attached on either side which bifurcate to the left and right of a red crescent. Two wide, diagonal, red and blue saz leaves drawn in a geometrical style form a flat gable at each end. The curled forms decorated with hooks in the dark brown main border are clearly abstract mythical creatures. They are interspersed with rosettes and, in the lower horizontal border only, with eight-pointed stars. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 50


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame.

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 178 *** OS 2, no. 50

  • Rug with Three Wheel Medallions

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    • Lot74
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions203 x 146 cm
    • Age1550 - 1600
    • Estimate EUR12,000 - 15,000

    It is highly probable that this rug originally had three wheel-like medallions in the field. The shape that it has been cut into suggests that it may well have served as a horse blanket for some years. Textiles would often be recycled in this way in the Orient. Each wheel medallion has a band of flowers above and below. It is as if the field pattern is divided into three vertical sections: the column of wheel medallions forming the central section; flanked on either side by a column of hooked tree-like forms alternating with small octagons. – The figures placed in between the leaves on the end borders give special interest to this rug. Collectors of Anatolian kilims might relate this to the elibelinde or mother goddess motif. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 51. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 51

  • Fragment with Elibelinde Border

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    • Lot75
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions52 x 138 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,500

    This section from the upper end of a rug probably represents just under a quarter of the original. We can be reasonably sure of this because a larger part (formerly in the collection of Hans Sienknecht and now in the Türck Collection) survives. It was probably woven by the same tribe as plate 51 and most likely had a very similar pattern. It is evident when combining the sections that the rug originally had a field design of three blue wheel medallions placed on the central axis. It was probably woven by the same tribe as plate 51 and most likely had a very similar pattern. Notwithstanding a number of differences in the individual ornaments, the composition and design are almost identical. In the rare main border, the large elibelinde figures arranged in an in-and-out rhythm in the horizontal bands are a striking feature. This section has colours as vibrant and fresh as the day it was woven. (MF and DM)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 52. The carpet is discussed in detail in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 52

  • Red-Ground Carpet with Central Hexagon

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    • Lot76
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Aksaray
    • Dimensions173 x 116 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR18,000 - 23,000

    In this rare rug from the north eastern Konya region, the proportions of the field and border section are striking. The small red field is narrow and the border much wider than usual. At the centre of the field, there is a cone-shaped design outlined in white with lateral hooks and two arrowheads that vaguely resembles a beetle. However, the weaver would probably not have understood this western association. All the forms used in antique Anatolian tribal rugs carried their own iconographic meaning, but since that culture, its rituals and visual language have now vanished it is unlikely that we will ever discover their significance. A tree with diagonal branches grows from the two points of the central motif. In the brown main border, large hexagons with serrated outlines and four double hooks are surrounded by a blue vine, and this same vine makes up the diagonal crosses with curled hooks placed between them. The border is remarkable for its precision of drawing and perfect corner solutions. Two elems with shield forms, a characteristic feature of Konya rugs, complete the carpet at each end. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 53


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 53

  • Ushak Border Fragment

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    • Lot77
    • OriginWest Anatolia
    • Dimensions62 x 40 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR300 - 400

    The surviving fragment is a small section of the right-hand border of an Ushak carpet from West Anatolia. A green-ground cartouche enclosing a red floral cruciform lies on a blue ground. The second large motif is a red-ground rosette. The two ornaments are linked by a red pole and used to alternate regularly in the progression of the design. Halved rugged palmettes cut by the sides protrude into the free spaces. A narrow stripe of the field remains at the left-hand side. It is not possible to even conjecture about the original appearance of the carpet as no other Ushak with this particular border is known. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 54.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame.


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 54

  • Red-Ground Medallion Carpet

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    • Lot78
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Konya
    • Dimensions172 x 122 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR6,000 - 8,000

    After the Hamburg exhibition in 1993, Heinrich and Waltraut Kirchheim grew somewhat disillusioned with the ‘Konya’ group of rugs that they had collected, but they still acquired early examples such as this. The Konya rugs tend to have bold compositions, often with large areas of plain undecorated areas and therefore appeal more to collectors of Western artists of the 1950s and 1960s such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Kenneth Noland, Morris Lewis, Robyn Denny and John Hoyland. At the centre of this rug is a large diamond-shaped medallion with a yellow-beige background edged all round with a band of blue hooks that extends into a hooked finial at each end. Its spider-like interior drawing consists of eight arms radiating outwards from a small diamond. Each arm ends in a large blossom that almost touches the inner side of the medallion. Only the four blossoms of the vertical and horizontal arms are decorated with a double hook and point. This could be a two-dimensional rendition of an animal tree design. Triangular ornaments, with a band of hooked motifs only on the diagonal side, are placed in each corner; if joined together they would form a smaller diamond. Almost all the motifs in the field are outlined in brown. The main border is possibly the most spectacular part of the rug and enough survives at the upper end to allow us to appreciate its bold and monumental design. It is not unusual to find such a kufesque band on mosque facades in the region, and this is somewhat reminiscent of the decoration around the entrance to the Eşrefoğlu Mosque in Beyşehir. (MF and DM)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 55. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 55

  • Konya Fragment with Central Medallion

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    • Lot79
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions172 x 122 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR20,000 - 25,000

    This rug is remarkably attractive, and the large part that survives is in full pile with finely spun and lustrous wool. The colours are remarkably fresh and the proportions of positive and negative space, between decorated and undecorated areas, are in perfect balance. The large blue hexagonal medallion, the diamond-shaped pendants at each end and the corner pieces are all outlined with bird-like hooks in either green or blue. Within the medallion are four green lobes facing the cardinal points. This particular medallion form can be found on a number of other rugs, in particular long runners from various tribes within the Konya and Ladik regions of central Anatolia and continued to be used right up to the early 19th century. – Eight-pointed stars and octagons are placed in regular order against the red background around the medallion, along with a triangular jewellery-like amulet that is mirrored and resembles a diabolo. – The primary border is particularly striking, with a simple repeating design changing from blue to red to green and set against a beautiful yellow background. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 56. The carpet is discussed in more detail in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric

    Formerly: Friedrich Spuhler, Berlin

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 176 *** OS 2, no. 56

  • Six Fragments of a Red-Ground Ladik

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    • Lot80
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • DimensionsDiverse
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000

    These six small fragments of a Ladik-group carpet from central Anatolia have a field pattern of the knot and rotating motifs, which are better drawn than on the older examples. Parts of the upper finish with shield forms enclosing a lily have also survived. The Kirchheim sections were originally part of a long runner, perhaps around 4 metres long. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 57. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Dennis Dodds, Philadelphia


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 57