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Orient Stars 2

Saturday 02. October 2021 at 6 p.m.

98 Lots
  • Konya Niche Carpet

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    • Lot81
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions347 x 102 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    The directional field design of this long, narrow Konya rug is a succession of ascending interlocked arches in various colours, whereby further arches are inevitably formed by the red ground of the field. It has a deeply religious meaning of a transitory nature, depicting a kind of ladder to heaven. The wide stepped arches differ considerably in shape. The impression is that the weaver gave free reign to her imagination and her own creative drive rather than following a predetermined plan. The bases along the sides that support the arches are adorned with a rich variety of small ornaments and four double amulets. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 58


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Krikor Markarian, New York


    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 64, 20 November 2004, lot 116

    Published:
    OS 2, no. 58

  • Medallion Rug Fragment with Serrated Bands

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    • Lot82
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Konya
    • Dimensions151 x 139 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR10,000 - 14,000

    This large fragment of a red-ground Konya rug was purchased by Heinrich Kirchheim at our auction no. 54. Seeing that remnants of the border survive, it is possible to determine the width of the carpet (ca. 156 cm), but as both ends are missing its original length cannot be established. The large blue medallion with a red centre edged in yellow was probably positioned at the exact midpoint of the field. The lower field corners, with a lilac ground on the left and a green ground on the right, are each decorated with small blossoms, a long tulip and a Talish rosette. The most striking feature of this unusual rug consists of the wide, serrated, diagonal bands in blue and yellow resembling flashes of lightning that both frame and separate the medallion and corners. There is no known carpet with a directly comparable design. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 59


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Franz Sailer, Salzburg


    Published:
    SOTHEBY'S New York, "The Sailer Collection" auction, 1 October 1998, lot 53 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 54, 20 May 2000, lot 48 *** OS 2, no. 59

  • Fragment with Medallions and Turkmen Güls

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    • Lot83
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions233 x 162 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR22,000 - 26,000

    The surviving section is the lower right corner of a carpet that was obviously very large. Resembling a kaleidoscope, the design uses a captivating variety of ornaments that seem to originate from different traditions. Their very rare combination raises a number of questions, for example, whether it was woven by a Turkmen or a Yürük tribal group. The whole composition poses a mystery. The lower end of the red field is decorated with rows of very large vertical Turkmen güls and Talish rosettes, but is then abruptly overlaid with a completely different design: a massive red-ground box shape with triangular blue-ground corner motifs and (probably) three huge nested octagons on its central axis, surrounded by an outline of shield forms arranged like rays that brings to mind Mamluk ornaments. Seeing that the carpet probably had a mirror-image composition, the gül section would have been repeated at the upper end. Similar Turkmen güls occur in the rug found in the Divriği mosque (now in the Vakıflar Museum, Istanbul). (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 60


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Krikor Markarian, New York


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 60

  • Fragment with Turkmen Güls

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    • Lot84
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions88 x 63 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR1,200 - 1,500

    Text as in lot 85


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 61

  • Fragment with Turkmen Güls

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    • Lot85
    • OriginEast Anatolia
    • Dimensions109 x 58 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR1,200 - 1,500

    The fragments presented here are from two similar rugs, almost certainly made by the same tribe. Both retain the full width of the field and are missing their borders, and their original dimensions remain unknown. The field of plate 61 was probably longer at both ends. Plate 62 has a narrow band at the lower end, showing that this was the bottom of the field, although the upper end is not complete and we cannot know its original length. – Both sections have a camel-coloured background, perhaps of natural undyed wool. The central güls are different on each rug, but the secondary güls, of which we see just half along the sides, are identical apart from their colour schemes. On plate 61 there is a half-gül above and below the central one that is quite unlike any other. The centres of the main güls on plate 62 are divided by a vertical line that is coloured differently on each one. On either side of this line is a motif not observed on other rugs. – Their closest comparisons as far as the form of the güls is concerned can be found in the rugs of the Turkic tribes of Varamin, east of Tehran in central Iran, which were the subject of an article by Parvis Tanavoli. He illustrated three with similar güls to the ones on these two Anatolian fragments. There are other examples from Iran with similar güls that are sometimes attributed to the Luri tribes. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, nos. 61 and 62. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 62

  • Konya with an Octagon Repeat

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    • Lot86
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions313 x 142 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR45,000 - 60,000

    This rug reveals once more the taste of the Kirchheims for bold and compelling patterns with an immediate appeal. The colours are particularly attractive, strong but still remarkably soft. At first glance, one sees a field pattern composed of large octagons with inverted hooks that are laid out diagonally against a soft red background. However, on closer inspection, what appears to be the background can become the pattern, and vice versa. Then one sees squares with hooks extending above and below, connected by a diagonal grid, similar to designs used on early Anatolian carpets. The red is left completely undecorated apart from in the very centre, where the weaver has inserted a pink double-hooked motif, almost like a swan. One of the striking aspects of this rug is that none of the ornaments are outlined – it is simply colour on colour. The reciprocal trefoil border is not drawn with any great accuracy, but it still has the desired effect of light on dark counterposed with dark on light. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 63. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Galerie Sailer, Salzburg

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    HALI 68, 1993, ill. p. 99 *** OS 2, no. 63

  • Yellow-Ground Şarkışla

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    • Lot87
    • OriginEast Anatolia, Sivas
    • Dimensions198 x 152 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR30,000 - 40,000

    Touch a rug of this Şarkışla type and one is immediately captivated: the wool is so soft that it is utterly compelling. Occasionally goat’s wool was used, although I suspect that in this instance it is from baby lambs, possibly taken from the neck. There is a complete freedom of expression in the design. The weaver clearly started with one plan, as witnessed by the part-medallions at the lower end, but then had a change of mind, bringing in more common motifs, and then, in a typical Kurdish manner, scattered all kinds of archaic ornaments across the field. All of the principal ornaments are outlined. – It is difficult to attribute such rugs with accuracy, because the Kurds traditionally migrated great distances between summer and winter quarters, often over thousands of kilometres, although they tended to stay within familiar routes. A guide to the Kurdish rugs of Şarkışla that have either been published or have come onto the market over the past forty years has been assembled by John Taylor. At least seven examples have a similar primary border of an angular ‘S’-serif form in blue against a dark brown background. It is likely that these were made over a considerable period, and the Orient Stars rug might well be one of the oldest to survive. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 64. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Galerie Sailer, Salzburg

    Exhibited: Hamburg, Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993; Mönchengladbach, Museum Schloss Rheydt, 1995


    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 54, 20 May 2000, lot 160; A 80, 19 May 2012, lot 184

    Published:
    OS 1, no. 214 *** OS 2, no. 64

  • Two Red-Ground Konya Fragments

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    • Lot88
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • DimensionsA = 66 x 60, B = 91 x 119
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 4,000

    Four sections survive from what was once a very beautiful rug with glorious colours. The three from the lower right corner have been reassembled in approximately their original position. The square section from the left side cannot be placed relative to the others because it is impossible to determine either the width or length of the original rug, which was probably a long runner, from what remains of the pattern. – The border has the leaf and calyx design that was commonly used in the 19th century in the Caucasus, and less frequently on Anatolian rugs. The simple interlocking ‘S’ forms on the inner stripe in yellow and aubergine, and on the outer in red and ivory, are rare. More unusual, though, is to have an extra outer guard border, here on a yellow ground, on the sides but not the ends. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 65. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Krikor Markarian, New York


    Published:
    OS 2, no. 65

  • Fragment with Rosette Design

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    • Lot89
    • OriginAnatolia
    • Dimensions205 x 93 cm
    • Age1650 - 1700
    • Estimate EUR2,000 - 3,000

    As far as I know, this is the only carpet with this design to survive. Nor have I found any earlier versions of this particular rosette, which may well be based upon the Turkmen Talish rosette already discussed. It is likely that what we see here is a simplification of a pattern that had been used since at least the last quarter of the 15th century. – This rug has an incredible variety of colours and imaginative combinations of them. Although it is certainly Anatolian, as determined by its colours, wool and weave, the overall impression nevertheless reflects the charm of a 19th-century rug from the Shirvan region of the Caucasus. (MF)

    Extract from OS 2, no. 66. The carpet is discussed in detail and assessed art historically in that publication.


    Mounted on canvas

    Exhibited: Hamburg Deichtorhallen, 1993; Stuttgart, Linden-Museum, 1993


    Published:
    OS 1, no. 173 *** OS 2, no. 66

  • Fragment of a Konya Niche Carpet

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    • Lot90
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions136 x 120 cm
    • Age1700 - 1750
    • Estimate EUR15,000 - 20,000

    A huge, blazing red niche ascends initially at a low angle and then rises steeply, ending in a curve at the top. Its shape is slightly asymmetrical and inclines to the right. Two green triangles that support it at the bottom are filled with small red-and-white dice in a mosaic style. The interior of the niche is completely empty, creating the impression of a gateway. It may represent the portal of a mosque or, in an iconographic sense, a view into the world beyond. The light blue upper section of the field forms a contrast to the niche not only in colour, but also in terms of its lattice design of fine yellow lines. They surround elongated arrow and hook forms which certainly had a symbolic and perhaps also a religious meaning. The style of the narrow main border, where stars alternate with dots, is reminiscent of similar borders found in early Ottoman court carpets from the workshops of Cairo. This formal resemblance is striking, but it is more than doubtful that the weavers of the Konya region would ever have been aware of these luxurious weavings. One particularly intriguing feature is the wide elem patterned in a band of large, hermetically interlocked trefoils in ochre and a deep purple as well as crescents. The fragment constitutes the upper section of a double niche carpet. It may have had a long format, with two facing niches spaced widely apart at both ends of the field, similar to the Calatchi carpet. The horizontal stripe below the niche is an indication of a different design having been used in the central panel. (DM)

    Detailed discussion and art historical appraisal by MF in OS 2, no. 67


    Mounted on fabric and attached to a wooden frame

    Formerly: Franz Sailer, Salzburg


    Literature:
    CALATCHI, ROBERT DE, Orientteppiche. Geschichte, Ästhetik, Symbolik. Munich 1968, pl. p. 159 = RIPPON BOSWELL, A 38, 15 May 1993, lot 115

    Published:
    HALI 83, Oct. 95, p. 148 *** OS 2, no. 67