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Major Spring Auction

Saturday 28. May 2022 at 3 p.m.

252 Lots
  • Karakecili Kilim

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    • Lot211
    • OriginNorth West Anatolia, Balikesir
    • Dimensions319 x 156 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,900 - 2,300

    This large two-panel Karakecili kilim features a "swastika" design drawn in dark colours on a white ground. This rare type was always woven without any lateral borders. The somewhat different lengths of the two panels results in a slight misalignment of the design along the central axis, where the two halves of the large hooked hexagons do not join seamlessly. – Good condition.


    Literature:
    PLÖTZE, KARL-MICHAEL, Welt der Kelims. Barsinghausen 2001, no. 74 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 81, 24 November 2012, lot 221 *** BÖHMER, HARALD, Nomaden in Anatolien. Ganderkesee 2004, ill. p. 165 on left

  • Lakai Suzani

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    • Lot212
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions220 x 168 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR17,000 - 20,000

    This magnificent suzani with a bluish pink silk foundation is probably a Lakai piece. This is suggested by the style of drawing of the design, certain motifs (such as the botehs) and the cool colours of the large blossoms, with predominant shades of blue. The embroidery has been executed in the finest yurma stitch. We believe that it originates from the area between Kermina and Shakhrisyabz. – Somewhat fragile silk foundation, tears in the lower corner areas and several other places, otherwise very well preserved. Reverse backed with a red fabric, sides backed with an ikat fabric.


  • Göklen Torba

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    • Lot213
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Turkestan
    • Dimensions40 x 100 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,800 - 2,400

    At first glance, this rare torba could be deemed a Tekke weaving on account of its field design of twelve flat Memling güls and large diamond-shaped secondary güls called "sagdak" by the Turkmen. However, the knotting structure, the wool and the dark palette as well as the divergent border design suggest that it was woven by Göklen and is attributable to Eagle Group 3. – Signs of age and wear, damaged corner on the right, a number of dark stains, missing kilim back.


    Literature:
    MACKIE, LOUISE & THOMPSON, JON, Turkmen. Tribal Carpets and Traditions. Washington 1980, no. 38

  • Ersari Main Carpet

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    • Lot214
    • OriginCentral Asia, middle Amu Darya valley
    • Dimensions312 x 178 cm
    • Agefirst half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR7,000 - 8,500

    The long and narrow format of this Ersari main carpet suggests that it was made by a tribal group who had become sedentary and was used in the main room of a house. Its immaculately drawn tile design consists of nested diamonds and intersecting diagonal bands. Among the colours, the clear shades of green, yellow and orange stand out. – This impressive Ersari, then still owned by A.S. Crosby, was first published by Thompson in "Carpet Magic" in 1983 and exhibited at the Barbican Centre, London. Later the rug was purchased by Peter Hoffmeister and re-published in the book on his collection in 2011. – Signs of age and wear, low pile in the bottom section, original selvedges preserved, damaged kilim ends. Provenance: Estate of Peter Hoffmeister


    Published:
    THOMPSON, JON, Carpet Magic. London 1983, pl. p. 96 *** TSAREVA, ELENA, Turkmen Carpets. Masterpieces of Steppe Art, from 16th to 19th Centuries. The Hoffmeister Collection. Stuttgart 2011, no. 111

  • Tekke Chuval

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    • Lot215
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions83 x 132 cm
    • Agelate 19th century
    • Estimate EUR1,800 - 2,300

    The field design of this Tekke chuval, horizontal stripes of varying widths, derives from Turkmen flatweaves. Although this item is a pile-woven version, it is rendered in the same style of drawing. The focus is on the central stripe of interlocked chevrons decorated with small star-shaped blossoms. In flatweaves these motifs were woven in the brocading technique. The chuval was previously published by Herrmann. – Minimally reduced at the bottom, missing back, good overall condition.


    Literature:
    PINNER, ROBERT & EILAND, MURRAY L. Jr., Between the Black Desert and the Red. Turkmen Carpets from the Wiedersperg Collection. San Francisco 1999, pl. 22

    Published:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche V. Munich 1983, no. 81 a

    • Lot216
    • OriginCentral Asia, middle Amu Darya valley
    • Dimensions287 x 152 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,200

    The former appellation of this rug group, "Cloudband" Beshir, is still a useful term for communication, but from our current perspective it incorrectly describes the iconographic meaning of the design. The serpentine red figures studded with small light dots along their outlines are clearly two-headed snakes rather than cloudbands. They crawl across the whole of the field whose ground changes between various shades of blue-green. – Signs of age and wear, uniformly low pile, various repaired and repiled sections, repiled upper finish, the original selvedges have largely survived.


    Literature:
    PINNER, ROBERT & EILAND, MURRAY L. Jr., Between the Black Desert and the Red. Turkmen Carpets from the Wiedersperg Collection. San Francisco 1999, pl. 90

  • Salor Chuval

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    • Lot217
    • OriginCentral Asia, West Turkestan
    • Dimensions79 x 116 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Estimate EUR5,700 - 6,600

    A Salor chuval with a thick pile finely woven in the asymmetrical knot open to the right. The field design consists of nine large, comparatively flat sary primary güls and smaller octagonal chuval secondary güls. The yarn used in the ruby sections of the güls is dyed with lac and thus heavily corroded. The main border shows kochanak hook forms and pairs of halved diamonds. The elem contains small flowering plants in an offset arrangement. At the upper end, a plain red horizontal stripe has been inserted between the border and the additional border finish. – Cut and reduced at both sides, replaced selvedges. Otherwise very well preserved, no back.


  • Karagashli

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    • Lot218
    • OriginEast Caucasus, Kuba-Shirvan
    • Dimensions146 x 104 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,500 - 4,200

    Four red rectangles outlined in white are the dominant motifs in the blue-black field of this Karagashli. The five red bracket shapes on the central axis associated with them prove that the design derives from older Harshang models. Ten brilliant white star-shaped blossoms and abstract geometric trees adorn the lateral spaces. The main design is completed by small decorative motifs, amulets and, above all, many animals as well as one horseman and two other human figures placed at the upper end. – Good condition, original selvedges, slightly reduced ends.


    Literature:
    BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike Orientteppiche. Brunswick 1978, ill. p. 277 *** FOKKER, NICOLAS, Caucasian Rugs of Yesterday. London 1979, ill. p. 85

    • Lot219
    • OriginSouth East Caucasus
    • Dimensions225 x 115 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR8,500 - 10,000

    This immaculately drawn Talish has a blazing red met hane field in which three Talish rosettes float like flowers on water. An inner outline of reciprocal trefoils separates the field from the wide border section, which shows the design of Talish rosettes and small dice that is typical of the provenance. – The sides and ends were damaged and incomplete. They have been reproduced so perfectly that the restoration is almost invisible.


    Literature:
    BURNS, JAMES D., The Caucasus. Traditions in Weaving. Seattle 187, ill. p. 35

  • Kirsehir Prayer Rug

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    • Lot220
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions167 x 122 cm
    • Agesecond half 19th century
    • Estimate EUR3,000 - 3,600

    Repiled upper finish, minimally reduced at the bottom, the original selvedges survive; high pile, good overall condition.