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VOK COLLECTION, Selection I

Saturday 11. April 2015 at 3 p.m.

86 Lots
Exchange rate
0.725 GBP1 Euro
1.060 USD1 Euro
    • Lot1
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions356 x 90 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Result EUR4,514

    Collection VOK: Suzani 1

    The design, style and palette of this suzani embroidered in a long horizontal format suggest that it was made in the northern Uzbek city of Tashkent. A decorative wall hanging, it would either have adorned a large wall or, in the case of smaller rooms, extended around the corners. The eleven circular primary motifs in brilliant red indicate that this is a suzani of the “paliak” type. The plain-coloured circles surrounded by wide vines symbolise lunar discs, arranged into two offset rows in this item. In the lower section of the field, the six larger lunar discs fill an arcade of curved arches showing the same design of petrol leaves and red blossoms as the border. The five smaller lunar discs above them rest on the roofs of the arcades. The free spaces in the upper section of the field resulting from the composition are densely patterned in colourful filler motifs. – Slight signs of age and wear, several stains. Backed with canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 1

    • Lot2
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Azerbaijan
    • Dimensions182 x 118 cm
    • Age2nd half 19th century
    • Result EUR9,760

    Collection VOK: Caucasus - Persia 2

    Steep, diagonal bands in diverse colours converge at the centre of the field, combining into ascending triangular gable shapes. The design continues into infinity at the top. Its momentum is accentuated by the 99 small triangular gable shapes in contrasting colours which embellish the bands. While the straight lines and simple shapes of the field design are characteristic features of village and nomad kilims woven in Iran, the motifs seen in the border section also occur in Kurdish flatweaves from north-eastern Anatolia. – In his detailed 1985 description, Herrmann refers to this beautiful and rare example as a West Persian Kurdish weaving while Sadighi assumes a provenance in the surroundings of Salmas in Azerbaijan. A kilim immediately comparable in field design was published by Volkmann in 1985, but his piece lacks the sophistication and quality of the Vok example. – Original finishes all around, very good condition.

    Literature:
    VOLKMANN, MARTIN (ed.), Alte Orientteppiche. Ausgewählte Stücke deutscher Privatsammlungen. Munich 1985, no. 49

    Published:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche 7. Munich 1985, no. 51 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 2 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 74

    • Lot3
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Manisa province
    • Dimensions235 x 170 cm
    • AgeCa. 1800 or earlier
    • Result EUR8,540

    Collection VOK: Anatolia 1

    Rather coarse in weave, soft in texture and executed in attractive pastel shades, this kilim is the product of a specialised West Anatolian workshop, possibly Kula or Selendi. Both towns were important textile centres during the Ottoman period. The design of wide bands, alternately decorated with floral or geometric motifs in the Ottoman court style, is a characteristic feature of this distinctive group. The directional tree design seen in some of the bands suggests that the kilims served as wall hangings, i.e. tapestries, and were suspended horizontally. They may have been used in the magnificent tents which accommodated Ottoman pashas during their frequent military campaigns. Both shorter and wider than comparative pieces, the Vok example was exhibited in Dublin as early as 1979. – Minimal signs of age and wear, good condition.

    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, Auctions of 30th May 1992, # 80; 13th November 1993, # 112; 16th November 2002, # 61 *** BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, pl. 33

    Published:
    MARCUSON, ALAN & FRANSES, MICHAEL, Kilims. The Traditional Tapestries of Turkey. (Exhibition catalogue Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin) London 1979, no. 5 *** PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. Munich 1980, no. 68 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch), Munich 1997, no. 1

    • Lot4
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Cappadocia
    • Dimensions430 x 142 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Result EUR14,640

    Collection VOK: Anatolia 40

    Published by Sailer in 1984 and exhibited at the Vienna ICOC in 1986, this kilim was described as a "Konya" in both catalogues. Hirsch attributes the kilim more precisely, stating that it was woven in a Kurdish village situated between Kayseri and Nigde in southern Cappadocia and that it served as a divan cover or wall decoration. Long and narrow, with a design emphasising the border, the item consists of four bands that were woven separately and then joined together. The wide long borders show powerful stepped pinnacles arranged to form a reciprocal pattern as well as short horizontal bars and many brocaded small devices. The white-ground field is embroidered in small diamonds and, at both ends, a number of amulets. Another example of this rare group which compares well, formerly in the Kirchheim Collection, was sold by us in October 1999. – Signs of age and wear, slightly corroded brown, several stains.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 4. Munich 1992, no. 104

    Published:
    GALERIE SAILER (publ.), Aus der Welt des Kelim. Salzburg 1984, no. 35 *** TKF-WIEN (publ.), Antike Orientteppiche aus österreichischem Besitz. Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Textil–Kunst-Forschung. Vienna 1986, no. 33 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 40

    • Lot5
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions160 x 118 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Result EUR31,720

    Collection VOK: Suzani 7

    In this half-size nim suzani (the Persian word "nim" translates as "half"), the spacious composition of only a few large-scale designs is striking. The style of the vines and the colours employed suggest that it was made in Kermina, a small town situated east of Bokhara along one of the transit routes traversing southern Uzbekistan. In the main border, eight circular poppy blossoms are linked by an elongated vine. The delicate vine of the outer border is decorated with blue flowers. The most spectacular feature is the large tree-like shape bearing five sweeping, sickle-like branches with curled ends which fills the field. The branches show a motley design reminiscent of a harlequin’s costume. Two thin green vines decorated with blue blossoms grow from the stem of a boteh at the lower end of the field, surrounding the central motif. Interpretation of the latter presents a mystery; the question of whether it is a plant design or a mythological bird in disguise, as proposed by Herrmann in his description of a comparative example, must remain unanswered for the time being. – Good condition, backed with canvas.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 4. Munich 1992, no. 104

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 7

    • Lot6
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions250 x 182 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Result EUR39,040

    Collection VOK: Suzani 27

    Suzanis played a central role in the lives of the people of Uzbekistan. Pervading all classes and ethnic groups, they are an art form produced by the entire population. Brides would bring to their marriages a number of embroideries made by themselves and their families as textile dowries. The quality of the textiles was the criterion by which their skill and the status of their families would be judged. Large covers of prestigious character served as bedspreads as well as tablecloths or wall hangings on festive occasions. After the ceremony, wedding cloths were frequently stored in wooden chests, accounting for their good condition. – Shakhrisyabz embroideries show the widest borders of all suzanis and use particularly elaborate border designs, two criteria that constitute their distinguishing features. This gorgeous example is striking because it lacks the ubiquitous circular blossoms in the design. Starting from the lower left-hand corner, a lush elongated vine bearing fan-shaped blossoms in various sizes and colours undulates through the main border. The twigs branching from it are decorated with small flowers, including tulips, carnations and blue irises. Drawn with a confident sense of proportion, the design of the field consists of a network of petrol diagonal branches that form compressed diamonds, their points of intersection marked by large red fan-shaped carnations. The curved, slightly concave branches bear elongated leaves with serrated outlines. Several branches are decorated with semi-circular blossoms. This composition is only encountered in a very few suzanis (see examples below). The suzani derives its particular appeal from its high proportion of light and brilliant colours (golden yellow, orange, ochre and light blue). – Good condition. The sides are still backed with the original silk ikat fabric while the canvas backing on the reverse is a later addition.

    Literature:
    BLACK, DAVID & LOVELESS, CLIVE, Embroidered Flowers From Thrace to Tartary. London 1981, no. 23 *** BAUSBACK, PETER, Susani. Stickereien aus Mittelasien. Mannheim 1981, pl. p. 43 *** COOTNER, CATHRYN M., Gardens of Paradise. In: HALI 30, London 1986, no. 4, p. 48 *** HALI 41, London 1988, ill. p. 47 (Burrell Collection Glasgow, inv. no. 30.4) *** RIPPON BOSWELL, auction of 11th May 1991, # 90; auction of 12th November 1994, # 54 and # 113

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 27

    • Lot7
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions260 x 172 cm
    • AgeFirst half 19th century
    • Result EUR24,400

    Collection VOK: Susani 13

    Although the wide border and dense design of this suzani display a certain affinity to Bokhara and Shakhrisyabz embroideries, the style of drawing and deviations in colour scheme seem to suggest that it belongs to the Kermina group. Drawn with great precision, the dense design is set off strikingly by the beige ground. The large blossoms in red, orange, salmon, a pale aubergine and light blue show the characteristic metallic sheen of Kermina embroideries, an effect partially achieved by the technique employed, whereby the surface is hermetically covered in fine chain stitch. The field design consists of two diamonds perfectly sized to fit the space, each enclosing a cruciform four-and-one medallion composed of a central circular blossom and four fan-shaped blossoms. The twelve circular blossoms of the border are ringed by green vines bearing ivy-like leaves and interspersed with diagonal twigs bearing larger flat leaves. – Good condition, backed with canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 13

    • Lot8
    • OriginNorth East Caucasus, Daghestan
    • Dimensions355 x 180 cm
    • AgeSecond half 19th century
    • Result EUR10,980

    Collection VOK: Caucasus - Persia 14

    Woven in a village inhabited by Avars, this large single-panel kilim displays the characteristic technique of this kind of Daghestan flatweaves - "lazy lines", single weft interlocking and overstitched design outlines. Abrashed in several places, the dark blue field is filled by two huge, red diagonal crosses, their ends decorated with branching hooks reminiscent of antlers. A blue wavy vine bearing hooks undulates through the red border. Lacking additional ornaments and drawn in a two-dimensional style, this expansive design is strongly reminiscent of Central Asian felt carpets from which it probably derives. – Slight signs of wear, good condition.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 14

    • Lot9
    • OriginNorth East Caucasus, Daghestan
    • Dimensions310 x 133 cm
    • AgeThird quarter 19th century
    • Result EUR12,200

    Collection VOK: Caucasus - Persia 10

    Framed by an expressive wide border showing abstract representations of birds in the secondary bands and serrated polygons in the central black-brown band, the field design of slightly curved diagonal stripes in attractive colours appears like a polychrome river. Suggesting a flowing movement, it provides a contrast to the harsh angular shapes of the border, creating a palpable sense of tension. The diagonal stripes are separated by embroidered contour lines and decorated with tiny dots. Judging by the coarse weave, the rustic style of drawing and the warps, which have been tied off into the net-like structure that is typical of Daghestan, this kilim may have been woven in one of the Lesghi villages of the region. However, Sadighi believes that it is a Shahsavan weaving from the southern Caucasus. The use of a fuchsine dye, now largely faded, provides the decisive indication of its age. – Original finishes all around, good condition.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 10 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 70

    • Lot10
    • OriginWestern Central Anatolia, Sivrihisar region
    • Dimensions391 x 164 cm
    • AgeMid 19th century
    • Result EUR9,150

    Collection VOK: Anatolia 39

    According to Hirsch, this large single-panel kilim was woven in the village of Holanta situated in the surroundings of Sivrihisar. Its memorable design consists of wide gables drawn in brilliant colours in an angular style. The designs have been arranged into a composition of two ascending vertical rows. Their comb-like outlines, deeply notched horizontally, combine with the ground of the field to produce reciprocal forms, achieving a complex and distinctly graphic overall effect. Hirsch states that kilims of this kind served as wall hangings on festive occasions. – Good condition, several stains.

    Literature:
    BALPINAR, BELKIS & HIRSCH, UDO, Flachgewebe des Vakiflar-Museums Istanbul. Wesel 1982, no. 58 *** TKF-WIEN (publ.), Antike anatolische Teppiche aus österreichischem Besitz. Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Textil–Kunst-Forschung. Vienna 1983, no. 39

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 39