Sprachauswahl
Language

VOK COLLECTION, Selection II

Auction A 88 on Saturday, 12th March 2016

Lot numbers 89 – 176, 88 Lots
Exchange rate
0.776 GBP1 Euro
1.109 USD1 Euro
  • Ottoman Striped Kilim

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot110
    • OriginWest Anatolia, Manisa province
    • Dimensions265 x 152 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Result EUR9,150
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 2

    The Vok Collection includes two examples of these rare striped kilims. Presenting the same design layout, they appear very similar at first glance, but a closer look reveals distinct differences between them. The first example of comparatively coarse weave (Anatolia 1) was sold in April 2015. The second example offered now (Anatolia 2) is finer in weave, richer in colour range, different in design repertoire, and its overall appearance is not rustic. It has an elegant and courtly look. – It now seems certain that the striped kilims presenting Ottoman floral designs were woven in workshops in the West Anatolian province of Manisa. Kula or Selendi are possible provenances. In the Ottoman period, both cities were important centres of textile production, which included commissions for the court or the nobility. – The design of wide stripes, alternately decorated with floral and geometric motifs in the Ottoman style, is a characteristic feature of this distinctive group. The kilims were probably used as wall hangings – like tapestries – and may have adorned the magnificent tents of Ottoman pashas during their frequent campaigns. – In this item, the wide design bands show trees decorated with tulips, alternately placed on a blue, brown or red ground. The direction of the trees changes at the exact centre of the weaving. With just two exceptions, the flanking geometric dividing stripes also change direction at the centre. In the narrower design bands, offset diamonds are combined into composite braid-like shapes that appear to flow, alternately on a white or a light yellow ground. – Very good condition.

    Literature:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, Der Kelim. Ein Handbuch. Munich 1980, no. 65 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 39, 13th November 1993, # 112 and A 59, 16th November 2002, # 61 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 1 *** BRÜGGEMANN, WERNER, Yayla. Form und Farbe in türkischer Textilkunst. Frankfurt 1993, pl. 33

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 2

    • Lot111
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions262 x 183 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Result EUR32,940
    VOK Collection, Suzani 1, 22

    The field of this precious suzani is covered in a diamond lattice composed of slender blue-green leaves. The entire ground, including that of the border, is very finely embroidered in thin golden metal threads in the chain stitch technique. The graceful undulating lines of the metal threads constitute an underlying basic design in their own right, creating an effect of gentle movement and plasticity. Each of the diamond-shaped compartments contains a finely-drawn eight-pointed cross with four larger blossoms and four small buds at its ends. Slightly modified versions of the same motif can be found in the main border, where they are complemented by four pairs of sickle leaves arranged around them and interspersed with long diagonal panicles and further blossoms. The fact that all the designs are finely embroidered in the kanda khayol technique indicates a provenance in Shakhrisyabz, as do the vines surrounding small botehs in the secondary borders. – The enormous expenditure of materials and distinct court style suggest that this elegant suzani was commissioned from a workshop, possibly for the Emir of Bokhara. Its subtle pastel shades and delicate drawing are reminiscent of Ottoman embroideries. It is well known that the emir maintained relations with the sultan’s court, but whether these led to a cultural exchange remains a matter of speculation. – Slight signs of age and wear, small repaired areas, good overall condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 22

    • Lot113
    • OriginCentral Asia, North East Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions242 x 202 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Result EUR20,740
    VOK Collection, Suzani 2, 66

    This very old suzani from Ura Tube, a city situated at the entrance of the Ferghana Valley, exhibits a stunning profusion of motifs. The three wide design panels of the field and the extra-wide border display the same design vocabulary without any differences in scale. Unusually, there is no clear separation between the two sections in this item, and at first glance the two areas seem to merge. Although the design initially appears confusingly chaotic, the structure of a well-thought-out, highly compressed composition, strikingly rich in relationships, emerges on closer inspection. This degree of creative freedom is rarely encountered in suzanis. All the designs are finely embroidered in the yurma chain stitch technique and very delicately drawn. Due to constraints of space, we are unable to discuss their diversity in this publication. Small apotropaic symbols intended to protect the owner of this embroidery have been incorporated into the design everywhere. The fact that the motifs embroidered in black have almost disappeared due to corrosion suggests an early date. The suzani was published by Bausback as early as 1977, but the illustration was reversed left to right in his catalogue at the time. – Obvious signs of age and wear, the foundation is damaged in places. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    BAUSBACK, PETER, Antike orientalische Knüpfkunst. Mannheim 1977, pl. p. 206 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani 2. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 2006, no. 66

    • Lot114
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Kurdistan
    • Dimensions173 x 120 cm
    • Age2nd half 19th century
    • Result EUR3,050
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 65

    This small-format, coarsely woven Kurdish kilim originates from a village in the Bijar region. A large undecorated shield form stands alone at the centre of the poppy-red field. Each of its two steep stepped arches is crowned with a diamond. Due to heavy patination and abrash development, the surface of the double niche central medallion in changing shades of green and blue appears transparent, like a window that opens a view to an elusive world. The window effect is enhanced by a triple stepped outline in red, brown and yellow. Small stepped polygons are aligned in a row in the narrow border. Two further examples of this rare type, which dispenses with any kind of additional ornamentation, have been published in literature. – Signs of age and wear, thin spots at the centre of the field, several stains; the upper and lower finishes have been partially rewoven.

    Literature:
    GALERIE NEIRIZ (publ.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990, ill. 17 *** POHL-SCHILLINGS, HANS, Persische Flachgewebe. Bilder aus Iran. Cologne 1994, no. 2

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 65

  • Bokhara-Kermina Suzani

    Add to wishlist
    • Lot115
    • OriginCentral Asia, South West Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions242 x 180 cm
    • Age1st half 19th century
    • Result EUR34,160
    VOK Collection, Suzani 1, 9

    It is difficult to decide whether this suzani, very finely embroidered in the yurma chain stitch technique throughout, was made in Bokhara or the town of Kermina situated further to the north east. The two centres share many common features in terms of composition, ornamentation, embroidery techniques and colour schemes. In this item, the ochre foundation consisting of a very fine machine-woven cotton is striking; it was probably imported from India. Green twigs decorated with spiky leaves cover the field in diagonal and intersecting lines, combining into a close-meshed diamond lattice filled with a very rich variety of blossoms in diverse shapes, sizes and colours. Large circular blossoms, each surrounded by a wreath of light blue leaves, have been incorporated into a sweeping green wavy vine in the wide main border. Embroidered in opposite directions, the stitches employed in all the larger designs create a lively and three-dimensional effect. In sunlight, the colours gleam and sparkle light bright jewels on the dark ground of the field. A precious suzani of magical beauty. – Very well preserved. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 9

    • Lot116
    • OriginNorth Persia, Varamin region
    • Dimensions309 x 178 cm
    • Age1st half 19th century
    • Result EUR7,320
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 51

    In 1789 Tehran became the seat of government of the Qajar dynasty, then recently come into power. Shortly afterwards a number of nomadic tribes settled around Varamin, a city situated some 40 kilometres to the south east and thus in the vicinity of Tehran. The khans of the leading tribes wished to be close to the country’s new centre of political power; for their protection, they brought with them their own household guards whose military camps later developed into permanent settlements. The tribes intermarried, and the identity of the individual groups was lost over time. Today the inhabitants of the region simply describe themselves as "Varamini". In historical terms, it is thus difficult to definitely attribute Varamin weavings to a particular ethnic group. – Woven in a single panel, this large kilim is described by Sadighi as the oldest surviving example from Varamin. It may be the work of a Luri weaver. This is suggested by the dark brown warp, the muted palette of reds, browns, ochres and sandy yellows as well as the stunning effect of the somewhat irregular design. Diagonal rows of sharply serrated devices combine to form concentric diamonds composed of colour diagonals which increase in size as they approach the sides. The focal point of the composition is not the exact centre of the field, but has shifted to the upper section. The white serrated devices provide structure in an inherently confusing design, dictating how it is read. In concept the kilim is reminiscent of Anatolian weavings. There are no lateral borders, and the ends of the field are accentuated by two wide elems of horizontal stripes decorated with serrated devices and motifs composed of triangles. The technique used in this item is single weft interlocking. The small white flowers seen in the elems are a characteristic feature of all Varamin flatweaves. – Signs of age and wear, damaged sides.

    Literature:
    GALERIE NEIRIZ (publ.), Kelims der Nomaden und Bauern Persiens. Berlin 1990, ill. 17 *** POHL-SCHILLINGS, HANS, Persische Flachgewebe. Bilder aus Iran. Cologne 1994, no. 2

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 65

    • Lot118
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Kurdistan
    • Dimensions556 x 167 cm
    • Age1st quarter 20th century
    • Result EUR12,200
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 52

    This very large, all wool slit tapestry was woven in one of the Kurdish villages in the Bijar region. Produced in the kelleh format, it was placed on the floor in the main room of a traditional Persian house. The wool, the light and warm colours, some of them in mottled design, the specific weaving technique and the type of end finish are typical features of Bijar kilims, but the rare design is not. The abstract kaleidoscopic mosaic design consists of small diamonds in fourteen different shades arranged in offset rows without any immediate diagonal colour relationships. The flattening seen at the vertical points of the diamonds results in curved offset lines rather than straight diagonals. There was no need for the weaver to add any further decorative devices. Another example of this rare kilim group was sold by us in 2005. – The impressively “modern” effect is based entirely on the interplay of colour and form. Comparisons with contemporary European art spring to mind, such as Gerhard Richter’s Colour Field Paintings. A particularly inspired example is his glass window in Cologne Cathedral. – Original finishes all around, very good condition.

    Literature:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, auction A 66, 19th November 2005, # 20

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 52 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 55

    • Lot119
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions335 x 145 cm
    • Age Ca 1800 or earlier
    • Result EUR31,720
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 58

    This extremely rare kilim composed of two panels is captivating in appearance. It exudes an air of mystery and magic that makes it a true "cult kilim". The composition of just a few colours and designs focuses on essentials, omitting anything superfluous. We do not know the sacred message contained in this kilim, but we do sense its numinous aura. – The diverse shades of red in the right-hand panel are striking. It can be assumed that the different hues were employed deliberately to create a contrast to the other side. Apart from a few protective symbols in the brocading technique, the inner section has been left undecorated, allowing the blood-red ground colour to come into its own. The sides of the field are decorated with sharp points, creating a smooth transition to the white-ground border containing powerful, reciprocal spiral hooks. Only one other kilim with a border like this has been published to date (see below). – It is no surprise that this vibrant kilim is one of the collector Vok’s favourite items. – The provenance assumed by Hirsch is the mountainous region between Ermenek and Konya. The kilim probably once belonged to the inventory of a mosque and has survived for this reason. In Anatolia, it was traditional to donate a deceased person’s coffin cover to the local mosque after the funeral. – Signs of age and wear, original sides, damaged ends, reduced at the top. Mounted onto canvas.

    Literature:
    PETSOPOULOS, YANNI, 100 Kelims. Meisterwerke aus Anatolien. Munich 1991, no. 56

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 58

    • Lot120
    • OriginSouth East Europe, Bulgaria
    • Dimensions385 x 338 cm
    • Age1st half 19th century
    • Result EUR10,370
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 17

    This large kilim was made in the mountainous region of north western Bulgaria, probably in the area between Sarkoy and Ciprovzi on the Serbian border. It dates from a period when modern-day Bulgaria was still known as Rumelia and belonged to the Ottoman Empire (until 1879). The indigenous population produced such kilims both for home use and for sale. Several large-format kilims have survived in the regions monasteries, and it is conceivable that they were woven there, too. Usually attributed to Thrace in rug publications, their specific repertoire of designs and motifs, their distinctive palette and their use of tapestry weaving technique, with eccentric wefts for rounded motifs, make these kilims a group in their own right. The characteristic tree-of-life designs are encountered in many variations. In this item, a huge, discrete cherry-red niche outlined in green is placed on a midnight blue ground, which is studded with small red double arrow motifs. In its interior, a mirror-image tree-of-life opens its branches bearing diamond-shaped stylised fruit. Representations of animals have been incorporated into the design everywhere, and three human figures with outstretched arms are standing at the lower end of the field. The border is filled with miniature versions of the niche form, each containing a small tree with a bird perched on top. Minimal signs of wear and very good overall condition because the kilim was always used as wall hanging.

    Literature:
    BÖHNLEIN, KLAUS, The Mystery of Sharköy - Background to a Kilim Attribution. In: PINNER, ROBERT & DENNY, WALTER B. (eds.), Oriental Carpet & Textile Studies I. London 1985, p. 217, ill. 4a *** BLACK, DAVID & LOVELESS, CLIVE, The Undiscovered Kilim. London 1977, pl. 2 *** HALI vol 4, no. 3. London 1982, p. 85 (Sorgato & Michail advertisement) *** STANKOV, DIMITRAR, Heritage Artistique Bulgare: Carpettes et Tapis. Academie Bulgare des Siences, Institut des Arts. Sofia 1975, no. 304 (owned by Rila Monastery, 385 x 400 cm) *** SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe, undated (2014), no. 1

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 17

    • Lot121
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions545 x 117 cm
    • Ageca. 1900
    • Result EUR7,198
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 41

    Woven from firmly twisted wool yarn, this very long and narrow flatweave consists of two panels joined at the centre. It uses the same warp-faced plainweave technique as Persian jajims or Turkmen tent bands which produces a closely woven texture without slits. This made such textiles ideal for everyday use by nomads. The abstract design of narrow vertical stripes in white and black-brown seen here is created by the warp; the wefts are invisible. The sides were edged in cross stitch using red and green threads, then both ends were folded back and sewn up. – Sadighi adopts the Persian term "plas" for these flatweaves and provides the following information on their use: "The longer Plas were fixed to the bottom of the tent, as protection against the wind". Woven exclusively for home use, only a very few of these textiles appear to have survived. An almost identical, albeit shorter example was published in the recent book by Sadighi and Hawkes, while a further piece with red lateral stripes was illustrated by Tanavoli. – An intriguing comparison can be drawn with Bridget Riley's "Horizontal Vibration", one of her early paintings with a composition of black and white horizontal stripes that vary slightly in width and continue into infinity. Despite the fact that an immediate influence cannot be assumed, the British representative of "Op Art" arrives at the same visual result as the anonymous Qashqa’i weaver. – Good condition, several stains, patinated with age.

    Literature:
    SADIGHI NEIRIZ, HAMID & HAWKES, KARIN, Kelims und andere Flachgewebe aus der Sammlung Neiriz. Calbe, undated (2014), no. 171 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 213 *** HALI 79, London 1979, p. 19 (Adv. M. Naziri)

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 41