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VOK COLLECTION, Selection II

Auction A 88 on Saturday, 12th March 2016

Lot numbers 89 – 176, 88 Lots
Exchange rate
0.776 GBP1 Euro
1.109 USD1 Euro
    • Lot164
    • OriginSouth West Persia, Fars province
    • Dimensions276 x 150 cm
    • Agelate 19th century
    • Result EUR7,930
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 102

    Three diamonds framed by colourful stepped bands are aligned on the central axis of a coffee-coloured field abrashed in several places. Their four points are decorated with stepped polygons. The diamonds are linked vertically to form a large motif, creating a unified tripartite whole. Diagonal bands of white stepped polygons flow around the primary motifs like diamond-shaped ornamental chains. The field is separated from the reciprocal trefoil border by a wide golden-yellow surround decorated with stylised diamond-shaped botehs quartered by colour change – a distinctive feature of most Qashqa’i and Luri kilims. The wide end finishes present red and green horizontal stripes as well as brocaded "domino" motifs. – The expressive field design and beautiful palette of this kilim are remarkable features. Examples with a dark brown ground are comparatively rare. According to Sadighi, it was woven in the Kohgilujeh region. – Repaired upper right-hand corner, otherwise very well preserved.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 102

    • Lot165
    • Origin Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions392 x 156 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Result EUR9,150
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 71

    The red-orange field is filled by two huge hexagons enclosing nested serrated diamonds and a smaller central motif of three hexagons piled on top of each other. The three primary designs are decorated with massive sprawling arms and powerful double hooks scrolled at the ends. They appear like the tentacles of a huge octopus and, in consequence, create a frightening effect. The lateral borders consist of light blue and brown serrated points. The prevailing colours of the field – red orange, dark brown and blue – produce an almost dangerously beautiful atmosphere, with smaller sections woven in cochineal and lime green. In the wide elems, the central band is particularly striking on account of its elibelinde figures; very beautifully drawn, they almost appear to dance. - In April 1997, the Institute for Particle Physics of ETH Zurich conducted AMS radiocarbon dating. The time spans determined were AD 1642 - 1708 (25.6 %) and AD 1712 - 1821 (50.6 %), resulting in an average age of 205 +/- 45 years. The estimated age of the kilim could thus be ca. 280 years; it is certainly an 18th century example. – Obvious signs of age and wear, various missing sections; the warps are visible in many places. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 71 *** RAGETH, JÜRG (ed.), Anatolian Kilims & Radiocarbon Dating. A New Approach to Dating Anatolian Kilims. Riehen 1999, no. 28

    • Lot166
    • OriginCentral Asia, Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions225 x 186 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Result EUR26,840
    VOK Collection, Suzani 1, 21

    This unusually wide suzani is one of the oldest examples in the collection. It exudes a sense of peace and harmony; its provenance remains a mystery. It is assumed that it originates from the region between Ura Tube and Samarkand, but the precise location has not been established to date. The embroidery technique employed – kanda khayol as well as basma stitches, sometimes combined in the same design – does not constitute a reliable pointer for determining the provenance. The dominant colours are dark red and light green. The design is conceived with great perfection and drawn in an elegant style. Delicate golden vines decorated with spirals and light green leaves cover the entire surface, their curved lines combining into ogival compartments that each enclose a large red poppy blossom represented in side view. The blossoms point both upwards and downwards, thus the design is not directional. The wide main border is highly unusual; it contains two-dimensional leaves arranged into a lattice surrounding heart-shaped and butterfly-shaped red blossoms. The light and diverse colours of the inner secondary border are striking. The fine diagonal panicles and small circular blossoms are familiar from Ura Tube suzanis. – Slight signs of age and wear, small restored sections, good overall condition. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    HALI 30, London 1986, p. 63 (Galerie Nomadenschätze advertisement) *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 21

    • Lot167
    • OriginCentral Asia, North East Uzbekistan
    • Dimensions218 x 165 cm
    • Ageearly 19th century
    • Result EUR61,000
    VOK Collection, Suzani 1, 26

    The field of this unique suzani displays a section of a design conceived to continue into infinity. Light green twigs, divided again and again like arabesques and curving in different directions, and serrated light green sickle leaves combine into a spaciously conceived, airy framework. The twigs are decorated with 26 large fan-shaped palmettes, 21 flowering trees and four small blossoming twigs. Delicate star-shaped blossoms and small birds have been incorporated into the eccentric design. The convoluted nature of the basic design and the frequent changes in direction seen in all the motifs produce a complex interplay of lines, forms and colours. It is futile to search for points of repetition in this fantastic structure which appears exotic and may be influenced by Indian textiles from the Mughal period. The sprawling and dynamic movement of the field design is held in check by the design of the main border, where circular blossoms and palmettes are embedded in a system of graceful twigs and blossoms. The suzani was probably made in Ura Tube, although a provenance in a town further to the west, in the Zarafshan river valley, is also possible. We are not aware of any immediately comparable examples. – Slight signs of age and wear, minor restored sections. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Suzani. A Textile Art from Central Asia. (Text by Jakob Taube) Munich 1994, no. 26

    • Lot168
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Kurdistan
    • Dimensions196 x 141 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Result EUR17,080
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 70

    The midnight blue field beneath the steeply ascending, pointed arch with a notched upper section is densely filled with delicate botehs identical in colour and drawing, arranged in offset rows that alternately point to the left or right. The small size of the botehs and their hermetic arrangement make the field appear surprisingly wide. The design in light pastel shades covering the entire upper section of the field is composed of fine vertical stripes, enlivened and structured by midnight blue bands repeated at regular intervals. Its colours and ornamentation create an exciting contrast to the lower section of the field. In style, the fine stripe design is closely related to Kerman fabrics. The narrow main border displays the same structural principles of precisely drawn, red and white diagonal stripes juxtaposed with two flowing and minutely detailed floral borders. – Fine as a cloth in texture and woven from the finest wool in a very elegant design of delicately drawn motifs, this Sehna kilim is one of the best surviving pieces – a true work of art and a representative example of the refined taste that prevailed in the Qajar period. Comparable Sehna kilims are depicted in 19th century Persian paintings and photographs where they are always shown in a luxurious context, often related to the court. They were prestige objects par excellence that demonstrated the social status of the owner. – Very good condition.

    Literature:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Asiatische Teppich- und Textilkunst 2. Munich 1990, no. 43 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pls. 47 and 48 *** SOTHEBY'S London, auction of 27th April 2005, # 23 *** CHRISTIE'S London, auction of 29th April 1993, # 386 *** RIPPON BOSWELL, A 45, 26th June 1999, # 162

    Published:
    HERRMANN, EBERHART, Seltene Orientteppiche V. Munich 1983, no. 56 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 70

  • The Jacoby Sehna Kilim

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    • Lot169
    • OriginNorth West Persia, Kurdistan
    • Dimensions180 x 130 cm
    • Agemid 19th century
    • Result EUR39,040
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 71

    In 1966, it took Heiner Jacoby, son of the PETAG founder, days of negotiation in Istanbul before he was able to purchase this highly sophisticated Sehna kilim for his private collection. Later he reluctantly parted with his favourite piece, consigning it to us for our May 1988 auction. The price achieved at the time (DM 64,900) was a new record. – Woven as finely as a cloth from the best quality wool, in a rich range of colours and an elegant, delicately drawn design, this Sehna kilim is captivating on account of its perfection and extraordinary beauty. The field design – offset rows of pairs of botehs inclined towards each other – encloses tiny flowering shrubs and minute flowering trees in the intervening spaces. They all appear to float almost weightlessly under a blue-black sky. The main border – fine, red and white diagonal stripes running elegantly across the corners to converge in a steep angle at the top and bottom centre – is wide enough to provide a solid frame for the expanded design of the field. The overall effect is that of a harmonious, balanced whole. – Minor rewoven areas, very good overall condition; the original net-like end finishes have survived.

    Literature:
    BLACK, DAVID & LOVELESS, CLIVE, The Undiscovered Kilim. London 1977, pl. 55 *** STEVEN KING GALLERY, Prayer rugs. Concord, MA 1983, no. 2

    Published:
    RIPPON BOSWELL, A 27, 7th May 1988, # 112 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 71 *** OPIE, JAMES, Tribal Rugs. Nomadic and Village Weavings from the Near East and Central Asia. Portland 1992, p. 165, no. 9.18 *** TANAVOLI, PARVIZ, Persian Flatweaves. Woodbridge 2002, pl. 49

    • Lot170
    • OriginCentral Anatolia
    • Dimensions425 x 159 cm
    • Ageca. 1800
    • Result EUR7,320
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 21

    In this large single-panel village kilim from the Konya region, the quality and diversity of the brilliant colours are captivating. Although a striped kilim in design type, it is a strange variation. Two examples from the same group were published by Konzett and Cootner (McCoy Jones Collection). – Narrow stripes – either brocaded or plain and undecorated – regularly alternate with wider panels containing eight slender, red-brown or blue-green double niche motifs. Delicately hatched in thin lines, the tips of their arches extend as far as the lateral sides. Similar double niche motifs are encountered in saf multiple prayer rugs. According to Hirsch, such kilims were used as floor rugs, divan covers or wall hangings. – Slight signs of age and wear, corroded brown. Mounted onto canvas

    Literature:
    COOTNER, CATHRYN & MUSE, GARRY, Anatolian Kilims. The Caroline & H. McCoy Jones Collection. San Francisco-London 1990, no. 93 *** PLOIER, HELMUT, Gewebte Poesie. Frühe anatolische Kelims. Sammlung Konzett. Graz 1991, no. 75

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 21

    • Lot171
    • OriginCentral Anatolia, Cappadocia
    • Dimensions359 x 145 cm
    • Age18th century
    • Result EUR14,640
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 22

    The impressive effect of this fragmented kilim with a double niche design derives from the powerful bold shapes woven in clear and brilliant colours. Arranged separately on the white ground, the double niches each contain two diamonds placed side by side, divided horizontally and drawn with lateral parmakli outlines; further parmakli devices decorate the flat arches. The polychrome dividing bands interspersed between the niches are incised like combs at both ends. – The surviving fragments consist of one long section (216 cm) showing six design segments and one shorter section (81 cm) showing two design segments. A comparison with similar, completely preserved niche kilims suggests that this item is missing three niches. Should this assumption be correct, the yellow-ground niche would have originally constituted the centre of the composition, and would have stood out on account of its colour appearing only once in the design sequence. The way in which the item has now been secured to a canvas backing constitutes an attempt at reconstructing the original length. The illustration in "Anatolia" still shows an older montage with a distinctly shorter gap. We have used reproduction techniques to alter our image accordingly to avoid deviation from the Vok publication. – In April 1997, the Institute for Particle Physics of ETH Zurich conducted AMS radiocarbon dating. The time span determined was AD 1639 - 1824 (74 %), resulting in an age of 205 years +/- 50 years. This analysis confirms the assumption of an 18th century date for this kilim based on stylistic criteria.

    Literature:
    COOTNER, CATHRYN & MUSE, GARRY, Anatolian Kilims. The Caroline & H. McCoy Jones Collection. San Francisco-London 1990, pl. 100 *** KELIM-CONNECTION AACHEN (publ.), Kelim: Textile Kunst aus Anatolien. Aachen 2002, pl. 51

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 22 *** RAGETH, JÜRG (ed.), Anatolian Kilims & Radiocarbon Dating. A New Approach to Dating Anatolian Kilims. Riehen 1999, no. 21

    • Lot172
    • OriginNorth East Caucasus, Daghestan
    • Dimensions243 x 151 cm
    • Agelate 19th century
    • Result EUR9,150
    VOK Collection, Caucasus – Persia 9

    Nomadic Avar tribes advanced into the North East Caucasus as far back as the early Middle Ages, settling in the mountainous region of Daghestan. Living in remote villages, they were able to preserve their traditional culture for many centuries. They appear to have chiefly woven kilims for their own use, a large number of which has survived. Pile rugs are encountered far more rarely. The characteristic features of Avar kilims are a long and narrow format, a palette of dark shades, a harsh geometric design style and a specific weaving technique using lazy lines and some weft interlocking. – The rare design of this Avar kilim is striking. The blue ground of the field is covered in an endless repeat of large, stylised diamond-shaped elibelinde motifs in light red, black-brown, earth brown, yellow, aubergine and green, arranged in offset rows. Four of the motifs seen in the lower section of the field are hatched horizontally. The route by which the elibelinde motif – a typically Anatolian design – found its way to the Caucasus is unknown. The narrow dark brown border contains a serrated band of offset merging triangles with red outlines. Their aggressive shapes constitute an impenetrable protective fence to ward off sinister outside influences. An immediate comparative piece has not been published, but there are obvious similarities to one of the kilims in the Burns Collection. – Minor rewoven sections, good overall condition.

    Literature:
    BURNS, JAMES D., The Caucasus. Traditions in Weaving. Seattle 1987, ill. p. 44

    Published:
    VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Caucasus-Persia. Gilim and other Flatweaves. (Text by Hamid Sadighi) Munich 1996, no. 9

    • Lot173
    • Originwestern Central Anatolia
    • Dimensions373 x 152 cm
    • Agelate 19th century
    • Result EUR1,830
    VOK Collection, Anatolia 48

    This large, single-panel kilim woven in just two colours in an archaically simple design is from the Yerli village of Inköy in the Kütahya region. In 1997 Hirsch was aware of three examples of this type which he had seen locally. Among the Turkish villagers, such weavings were known as "bulgur kilims" because the kilims were used to dry boiled wheat (bulgur in Turkish) and prepare it for winter storage. In the sand-coloured field, ten earth-brown parmakli figures without interior drawing are arranged in two parallel rows. There are no additional designs. The earth-brown border is a simple surround of triangles linked to form a serrated band. – Signs of age and wear, several missing sections, damaged sides and several stains, reduced lower end. Mounted onto canvas.

    Published:
    MELLAART, JAMES & HIRSCH, UDO & BALPINAR, BELKIS, The Goddess from Anatolia. Adenau 1989, vol. 1, pl. VII, p. 32 *** VOK, IGNAZIO, Vok Collection. Anatolia. Kilims and other Flatweaves from Anatolia. (Text by Udo Hirsch) Munich 1997, no. 48